Old 12-01-2007, 11:14 PM   #1
TAMR159
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Default Confusion With Grain

Well, I was out railfanning today for a while and caught an empty ethanol train heading west. I took some glint shots of the train kicking up the snow, which I've done in the past with good results. However, upon inspecting the RAW files on the computer, I found them to be ridiculously grainy (these were shot at 1/500, F9.0, ISO200 on a Canon Rebel XT with a 75-300mm lens at 150mm).

http://users.eslw.org/TAMR159/photos/IMG11466.jpg

Is the blowing snow really causing the image quality to be that poor? Does ISO200 have that large of an impact with such a scenario? Any advice, personal experiences, etc. would be greatly appreciated! Thanks in advance!

Last edited by TAMR159; 12-01-2007 at 11:33 PM.
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Old 12-02-2007, 01:36 AM   #2
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The photo does not really have that much grain does it? My perspective on the image is that the snow just appears to make the photo appear to be grainy.
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Old 12-02-2007, 02:21 AM   #3
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Nice shot.
Looks like blowing snow to me - and that is not a snow job
A slightly wider view would probably show it is snow.
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Old 12-02-2007, 04:18 AM   #4
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I agree it looks like snow, and I even think it adds to the image...

Being telephoto at 150mm, the greater distance provides more particles between you and the train which is why it probably looks as strong as it does. A similar thing was talked about in this thread about taking snow shots.

http://forums.railpictures.net/showthread.php?t=6207

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Old 12-02-2007, 08:05 AM   #5
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Grain is usally colored, red or green mostly, I agree with consensus.
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Old 12-02-2007, 12:45 PM   #6
alan-crotty
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Default Grain?

Hi,

I agree, I thinks that's just snow.

What makes it look "bad" to you is some halation around the snow flakes caused by the back lighting.

Try darkening the blacks a little by using the offset command, not too much though.

I like the pic.

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Old 12-02-2007, 03:58 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WKUrailfan
Grain is usally colored, red or green mostly, I agree with consensus.
I have never seen grain that is colored. Not sure what would cause it to be.
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Old 12-02-2007, 04:44 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl Becker
I have never seen grain that is colored. Not sure what would cause it to be.
Digital noise (aka grain) is often colored, looking like tiny red, blue, green, etc. particles.
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Old 12-02-2007, 07:40 PM   #9
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Digital grain should always be colored, since it is a random pixel where you see light from either a red, blue or green sensitive pixel. If your noise is white, it would have to be random noise in all three primary colors at once, and that would really be some serious grain.
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Old 12-02-2007, 08:33 PM   #10
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Talking Grain? You want grain?

Here is an example of what I will charitably call the gritty realism school of B&W photography.....not that I intended that, but I was new to photography and shooting what we called Verycrummy pan (Verichrome pan) film.....and getting it developed at the corner drugstore. This one has been a real challenge for the noise reduction programs.

Gritty realism

I wonder if I submitted this to RP if it would get accepted or rejected for "noise". Maybe as a historic photo they would cut it some slack.

It is providing me with an interesting subject to learn more about using the various noise reduction programs and other techniques for hiding grain.
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Old 12-02-2007, 08:44 PM   #11
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Thanks John. That's a very interesting link.
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Old 12-02-2007, 09:36 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John West
Here is an example of what I will charitably call the gritty realism school of B&W photography.....not that I intended that, but I was new to photography and shooting what we called Verycrummy pan (Verichrome pan) film.....and getting it developed at the corner drugstore. This one has been a real challenge for the noise reduction programs.

Gritty realism
That's an impressive collection of classic shots you have there, John.
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