Old 09-07-2008, 08:30 PM   #1
J Douglas Moore
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Default What is the best slang term for.............

Different parts of our country have different terms for different things. In some places a Pepsi is a soda, in others it is pop............ Or do you put your groceries in a bag or a sack or maybe a poke.........

Always thought it would interesting to see what terms come up on a thread like this, SO, what is the best slang terms for different cars, such as ; Car Carriers... ... Imods........Hoppers, etc
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Old 09-08-2008, 12:31 AM   #2
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In Central PA it's known as soda..in Western PA where my family is from it's pop. Some areas call cabooses different things...such as crummy, hack, bus etc...Local freights I've heard called locals, drills. I'm sure i can think of more.
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Old 09-08-2008, 12:47 AM   #3
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In PA, it was common to call the vacuum cleaner the "sweeper." I remember in college a fellow Pennsylvanian came by my room and asked if she could borrow the sweeper and I said no problem as I grew up hearing it called that. As she left with the vacuum cleaner, my roommate from MT was looking at me dumbfounded and said, "What the hell just happened?"
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Old 09-08-2008, 12:52 AM   #4
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What most people call carbosy units (eg EMD Es and Fs), my Grandpa calls covered wagons.
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Old 09-08-2008, 04:48 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J Douglas Moore
Different parts of our country have different terms for different things. In some places a Pepsi is a soda, in others it is pop............

Well, the full name is "soda pop." Here in the midwest, people like to call it by its last name. However, the rest of the country is on a first name basis.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ween
In PA, it was common to call the vacuum cleaner the "sweeper." I remember in college a fellow Pennsylvanian came by my room and asked if she could borrow the sweeper and I said no problem as I grew up hearing it called that. As she left with the vacuum cleaner, my roommate from MT was looking at me dumbfounded and said, "What the hell just happened?"
Great story, Chris.
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Old 09-08-2008, 05:43 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYC Nick
What most people call carbosy units (eg EMD Es and Fs), my Grandpa calls covered wagons.
I believe we use that term to describe cowl units. Barns is another term used to describe the cowl units.
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Old 09-08-2008, 07:47 AM   #7
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Default Nick Names in UK

Here's link to the slang terms for some UK items.

http://www.rodge.force9.co.uk/faq/nicknames.html

And another for steam stuff

Steam Loco nicknames UK

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Old 09-08-2008, 09:22 AM   #8
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A QR CityTrain is often referred to as 'the local.' Each different type has a name as well, for example, a 220 SMU is a '220' or a 160 IMU a '160.'

The QR TravelTrain services such as The Sunlander, Spirit of the Outback, The Westlander, and The Inlander are often referred to as 'the mail.' This is because they used to carry mail.

The Diesel Tilt Train is often referred to as 'the Tilt' or 'Dieselene' and the Electric Tilt Train, 'the Tilt' or 'Eileen.'

The 1720, 2170, 2300, 2470 Class Diesel Locomotives are often referred to as 'A Clyde.' This is a reference to their builder Clyde/GM/EMD.

One of the most famous ones would have to be the CountryLink eXpress Passenger Train (XPT) which is commonly referred to as 'the Worm.'
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Old 09-08-2008, 11:58 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alan-crotty
Here's link to the slang terms for some UK items.

http://www.rodge.force9.co.uk/faq/nicknames.html

And another for steam stuff

Steam Loco nicknames UK

Alan
I think we may need a new thread to explain many of these terms
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Old 09-08-2008, 05:33 PM   #10
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Default Too True

Too True Steve,

We are divided by a common language

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Old 09-08-2008, 05:47 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slopes09
I believe we use that term to describe cowl units. Barns is another term used to describe the cowl units.
Covered Wagons are the old Fs and Es from EMD (as well as FAs and PAs from ALCO, and Sharks and Baby Faces from Baldwin, and C-Liners and Erie Builts from FM). They are a different type of construction than cowl units.

On the covered wagon, the frame of the unit is in the carbody, while on the cowl unit, the carbody is just a covering. This would be the F45, FP45, F40PH, SD50F, SD60F, etc.
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Old 09-08-2008, 09:35 PM   #12
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For a good description of cowl units, click on the following link. There are other pages describing cab and hood units as well. If you search around on wikipedia, you can find all kinds of info, such as descriptions and history of most EMD and GE units etc.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cowl_unit
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