Old 10-17-2005, 11:48 PM   #1
CG_F45
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Cool What do signals mean???????

I have a question...

What do red, yellow, and green signals mean? any imput would be great, thanks
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Old 10-18-2005, 12:01 AM   #2
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Red= Stop
Yellow= Proceed at restricted speed
Green= Go
At least that's what they mean around here...
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Old 10-18-2005, 12:01 AM   #3
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If you get a chance, look up "signal aspects" on google.com and look at some of the very informative sources of info on this topic. The reason to do this is that they mean all sorts of different things on different railroads, and also when in conjunction with other signals. It's not as simple as clear, approach, and stop as some might think. Perhaps if I get some time tonight, I will be able to write something out, but searching around on some of these signal sites will tell you a lot.
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Old 10-18-2005, 12:03 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NicTrain35
Red= Stop
Yellow= Proceed at restricted speed
Green= Go.
Red does not always mean stop, yellow can mean many other things, green is not always go. Again, it depends what kind of signal, whose railroad, what the other lights are on a signal. There are times you do not have to stop at a red, a green is not a clear, yellow may mean something else other than approach. It is pretty in depth, actually.
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Old 10-18-2005, 12:08 AM   #5
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Try this - http://www.trains.com/Content/Dynami...3/035lsexb.asp


It's still greek to me. Usually when the crossing arms go down I know a train is coming.

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Old 10-18-2005, 12:11 AM   #6
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It depends on where you're at. On NS (at least in ex-Southern territory), there are 10 different signal aspects. Different railroads have different rules, but here goes (Pat, you can scratch NS off your list now!).

Green = Clear/Proceed
Yellow = Approach/Caution (prepare to stop or be at restricted speed at next signal.
Red w/o numberplate = Stop
Red w/ numberplate or low yellow = Restricting (you can pass signal at restricted speed)
Yellow over Green = Approach Diverging (reduce speed, preparing to take the diverging route at next signal
Red over Green = Diverging Clear
Red over Yellow = Diverging Approach
Yellow over Yellow = Advance Approach (prepare to stop at 2nd signal. This is usually used when there's a short block)
Flashing Yellow = Approach Restricted (Approach next signal at restricted speed)
Red over Flashing Yellow = Diverging Route Approach Restricted (my favorite aspect to hear called on the radio)
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Old 10-18-2005, 12:14 AM   #7
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Here's a good site for starters. There are many more, and like I said, it is pretty in depth.

http://broadway.pennsyrr.com/Rail/Si..._us_norac.html


One aspect I have not seen, or maybe I just overlooked it here, is the red over flashing red that you can get on the UP. That is also a restricting, so I have been told.
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Old 10-18-2005, 12:21 AM   #8
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Red= Stop
Yellow= Proceed at restricted speed
Green= Go

That's what they mean here in Joliet. That's what the dispatcher told me. I understand they could be different at other locations.
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Old 10-18-2005, 12:22 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cmherndon
(Pat, you can scratch NS off your list now!).
Cool. By the time I get the time to look this up tonight, everyone will have it covered anyway, and that is great. This is a cool thread.

B&O CPLs are my favorite, they are covered in that last link up above.

While we are on the subject, does anyone out there have any signals displayed in their yard or anywhere? I would, I have a double searchlight from the Frisco with the 20 foot mast and a B&O CPL with the 24 foot mast. My wife thinks it is junk and doesn't want it in the yard. I tried the idea of incorporating them into my kid's playground in the backyard........ no go. If I could only convince her it is not junk..........................
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Old 10-18-2005, 10:33 PM   #10
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In the words of my father: "They don't mean anything. Even the engineers don't know. You can't trust them." I think these were sarcastic words of warning to be careful as an adolescent trackside railfan.
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Old 10-21-2005, 08:20 AM   #11
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Brit Colour Lights are:

Red: Danger/On
Amber: Proceed to be prepared to stop at the next signal/Caution
Double Amber (4-Aspect Only): Proceed to be prepared to stop at the signal after the next signal/Caution
Green: Proceed/Off
Lit-Up feather: Points set in direction of feather indicator.

Big-4 Semaphores:

GWR:

Distant:
45 Degrees Down: Proceed/Off
Level: Caution/On

Home:
45 Degrees Down: Proceed/Off
Level: Stop/On

LMS/LNER/SR:

They are the same, except the arm raises 45 Degrees.

Don't get me started on calling-ons etc...
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Old 10-21-2005, 12:45 PM   #12
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Several posts have indicated that a yellow signal indicates proceeding at restricted speed. On North American roads the term Restricted Speed has a very specific definition:


NORAC: Prepared to stop within one-half the range of vision short of a train, obstruction, or switch improperly lined. Be on the lookout for broken rail. Speed must not exceed 20 MPH outside interlocking limits, or 15 MPH within interlocking limits. This speed applies to the entire movement.

The General Code: When a train or engine is required to move at restricted speed, movement must be made at a speed that allows stopping within half the range of vision short of: train engine, railroad car, men or equipment fouling the track, stop signal, or derail or switch not properly lined. The crew must keep a lookout for broken rail and not exceed 20 MPH.

A yellow signal indicates the track is clear at least to the next block signal. Generally, an engineer woulud be expected to reduce speed to 30 mph upon seeing the signal with his train under control and prepared to stop at the next signal.

If the block ahead contained a train, misaligned switch, broken rail, etc., the signal would display either "stop" or "restricting." Depending on the railroad and location these two indications can be displayed in a variety of ways. Sometimes there are different speeds for passenger and freight trains due to different stopping distances.
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Old 11-01-2005, 11:34 PM   #13
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Thanks for all the help guys
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