Old 03-27-2007, 11:41 PM   #1
nickleplate
Junior Member
 
nickleplate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 8
Default Blurry Digital images...

OK its time to beg for help! I just got a Rebel XT and cannot get it to focus properly. Even on STILL objects! The screeners are tires of my b&^*%ing by now. Any pro input? Thanks.........
__________________
Long Live the Nickleplate....
nickleplate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2007, 11:44 PM   #2
Save The Wave
trainchaser.us
 
Save The Wave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Evansville IN
Posts: 357
Send a message via MSN to Save The Wave
Default

Some examples perhaps?
__________________
You give me a golf cart, a 12 pack and a lake, I'll show you how to have fun all day - Comedian Greg Hahn

The good, the bad and the ugly. My railpics
Save The Wave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2007, 11:48 PM   #3
nickleplate
Junior Member
 
nickleplate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 8
Default hundreds of them..heres latest..

Ooops forgot thanks...
Attached Images
File Type: jpg ns9678_846.jpg (161.1 KB, 237 views)
__________________
Long Live the Nickleplate....
nickleplate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2007, 11:53 PM   #4
Save The Wave
trainchaser.us
 
Save The Wave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Evansville IN
Posts: 357
Send a message via MSN to Save The Wave
Default

I cant get any EXIF from that photo, but I think your focus is probably ok. What appears to be happening, at least in this photo, is your are getting heat distortion between you and the subject.
What lenses are you using, what mode do you typically shoot in (AV, TV program, etc) and what AF are you using (servo, etc). Does the problem occur with wider angles as well? Also, single point AF or multiple point?
Save The Wave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2007, 12:00 AM   #5
nickleplate
Junior Member
 
nickleplate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 8
Default

this one was a 70-300 and i was probably close to the 300 mark. But even with my stock 18-55 i have problems and have to photo shop it. This one was on AV with f16. Shutter speed was 100.
__________________
Long Live the Nickleplate....
nickleplate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2007, 12:46 AM   #6
Frederick
Senior Member
 
Frederick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Hastings, Minnesota
Posts: 594
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nickleplate
Shutter speed was 100.
Shutter speeds that slow are usually no good for any kind of moving object.
__________________
Railpics Photos

Flickr Account
Frederick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2007, 01:25 AM   #7
Joe the Photog
Senior Member
 
Joe the Photog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Columbia, SC
Posts: 7,885
Default

I shoot on almost nothing but 100 ISO. If you're new to digital, nickleplate, you're probably expeting the sharpness to be exactly what it is out of prints. But with digital, you're probably going to have to do some sharpening just like the rest of us. The attached image is actually awesome. The front of the loco looks tack sharp.


Joe
__________________
Joe the Photog Dot Com
Joe the Photog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2007, 01:27 AM   #8
Joe the Photog
Senior Member
 
Joe the Photog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Columbia, SC
Posts: 7,885
Default

Sorry. I read shutter speed and thought ISO. I try not to go below 500 on a moving train. f8 seems a nice place to start for me too on sunny days. You said you shot f16 and 100 speed, what was your ISO?


Joe
__________________
Joe the Photog Dot Com
Joe the Photog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2007, 01:30 AM   #9
JimThias
Senior Member
 
JimThias's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 9,767
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nickleplate
this one was a 70-300 and i was probably close to the 300 mark. But even with my stock 18-55 i have problems and have to photo shop it. This one was on AV with f16. Shutter speed was 100.
Well, there's your problem. Try shooting around f5.6 to f8. On a sunny day, that'll put your shutter speed up to 800-1000 and if focused properly, you shouldn't get ANY blur (or camera shake). At 300mm at 100 shutter speed handheld and without IS, you're likely to get camera shake. I'm going to guess you probably used a tripod anyway for that shot. If so, the 100 shutter speed would definitely give the train a blurred look.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe the Photog
The attached image is actually awesome. The front of the loco looks tack sharp.


Joe
I can see some camera shake/motion blur.
JimThias is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2007, 02:17 AM   #10
PLEzero
Senior Member
 
PLEzero's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Pittsburgh,PA
Posts: 675
Default

Set the camera to ISO 200, f8, and a shutter speed of 400. This should be a good starting point for you to work from. The ISO 200 will allow you flexibility to change your shutter speed to a higher setting as well as increase or degrease your f stop as needed.

When I am out shooting I generally tend to try and meter the photo slightly on the + side. This allows the image to be a bit brighter when I open up the image in photoshop. Sometimes it seems as though my camera meters images dark. I also always take some test shots of the location well before there are any trains to adjust my settings to fit the situation.
__________________
Brad Morocco
Candyland, PA
My Flickr Photos
My RP.net Photos
PLEzero is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2007, 02:22 AM   #11
JimThias
Senior Member
 
JimThias's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 9,767
Default

If the lighting is bright and sunny, you should always go with the lowest ISO possible. No reason to introduce any more noise into the photo than necessary (and rebels aren't the greatest when it comes to higher ISO's and noise).
JimThias is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2007, 02:52 AM   #12
Mgoldman
Senior Member
 
Mgoldman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 3,607
Default

How ya doing NKP?

Here are a few bits of advice:

1) Digital cameras are notorious for shooting "soft" images.
The images seem less the razor sharp without a little bit of processing.
Ask most people and likely you will find that nearly everyone "sharpens" or uses something called an "Unsharp Mask" which makes images seem more defined when used correctly. NOTE, also, that this feature is sometimes built into your camera and can be applied in varying levels automatically.

An example (done quickly) is attached for your reference.

2) What was stated earlier is true - Faster shutter speeds will result in sharper images. A tripod will help out as well. It is true you were shooting a train comming at you which typically allows for a slower shutter speed, but 100th of a second won't cut it, AND, more importantly, if you are going to use a zoom, you really should be using a tripod - the slightest movement of the lens on your end could result in drastic movement of at the subject end. Ever point a laser pointer - get the idea?

3) It's a pretty darn nice photo, BTW, at least compositionwise.

/Mitch
Stop, look and comment!
Click Here to take a look at my photos on RP.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg NS RP NKP US.jpg (230.5 KB, 214 views)
Mgoldman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2007, 03:34 AM   #13
JRMDC
Senior Member
 
JRMDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 11,201
Default

First of all, very nice photo!

Second, I second (!) Mitch. You have to sharpen, you can't use an image straight out of the camera in most instances (unless it is sharpening in-body, which I don't advise).

Third, on a digital crop body, f/16 can also introduce a form of distortion called diffraction.
http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...hotography.htm

Fourth, very nice photo!
__________________
My RP pix are here.
My Flickr pix are here.

My commentaries on rail pictures are in my blog.

RP Photo Albums:
Cabooses
Engine Details
Farm and Train
Plumes!
Railroad Details
Signal Details
Switchstand Shots
JRMDC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2007, 04:19 AM   #14
a231pacific
Senior Member
 
a231pacific's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 822
Default

Mitch's sharpened version looks pretty darned good to me. The heat blur behind the train really adds to this image. If you submit it like Mitch has reworked it, I think it should be accepted.

That said, get your shutter speeds up! 1/500 is practically a minimum for rail photography. Use an aperture between f/5.6 and f/8 and pick your ISO accordingly. I'd rather deal with a tiny bit of noise than a blurred image.

Michael Allen
a231pacific is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2007, 04:20 AM   #15
nickleplate
Junior Member
 
nickleplate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 8
Default Thanks!!

Thanks alot for the input evereyone. Once i typed in the thread and 100 speed i think i realized the reason HOWEVER it does it on still shots too....Now i do drink alot of coffee so that doesnt help any and yes i do think a tripod would fix that! I sharpened this image once. The second attempt totally ruined the image. So i will just use it for my wallpaper. I havnt gotten many shots through lately so i didnt know if it was me or the camera. Im a film loyalist that has reluctantly stepped into the 21st century! Thanks for the positive comments.
__________________
Long Live the Nickleplate....
nickleplate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2007, 04:27 AM   #16
nickleplate
Junior Member
 
nickleplate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 8
Smile Mitches advice

I tried to sharpen more on the image so it is close to Mitches....Guess we shall see ... Thanks again. I have been wanting to shoot that spot for a long time but just finally got a lens to do it so hopefully I will get many more....
__________________
Long Live the Nickleplate....
nickleplate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2007, 09:37 AM   #17
Ween
Senior Member
 
Ween's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 4,861
Default

Quote:
If you submit it like Mitch has reworked it, I think it should be accepted.
I'm gonna have to disagree...the number boards messed up (not compressed, not pixelated, but they don't look right).

As was talked about, 1/100th is too slow. What's the rule of thumb: take the inverse of your focal length and that's your shutter speed? For instance, if you're shooting at 300mm, the minimum shutter speed should be 1/300s...
__________________
Ween is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2007, 03:28 PM   #18
a231pacific
Senior Member
 
a231pacific's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 822
Default

Ween is correct about the minimum shutter speed being the reciprocal of the focal length, but that's the minimum. I'd use 1/500 as my normal speed, if I were you.

If the shot you showed us is any indication, you've got a good photographic "eye." Solve the techical issues and you should start getting your shots accepted.

Michael Allen
a231pacific is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2007, 01:02 AM   #19
Ween
Senior Member
 
Ween's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 4,861
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimThias
If the lighting is bright and sunny, you should always go with the lowest ISO possible. No reason to introduce any more noise into the photo than necessary (and rebels aren't the greatest when it comes to higher ISO's and noise).
I'll go ISO 200 quite ofter to counteract the wind. The higher ISO allows me to get a higher shutter speed which helps on those gusty days...
__________________
Ween is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2007, 01:30 AM   #20
JRMDC
Senior Member
 
JRMDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 11,201
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ween
I'll go ISO 200 quite ofter to counteract the wind. The higher ISO allows me to get a higher shutter speed which helps on those gusty days...
On my rebel I would routinely shoot ISO 400, no problems. On my 20d, I frequently shoot 800.
__________________
My RP pix are here.
My Flickr pix are here.

My commentaries on rail pictures are in my blog.

RP Photo Albums:
Cabooses
Engine Details
Farm and Train
Plumes!
Railroad Details
Signal Details
Switchstand Shots
JRMDC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2007, 01:33 AM   #21
Mgoldman
Senior Member
 
Mgoldman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 3,607
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JRMDC
On my rebel I would routinely shoot ISO 400, no problems. On my 20d, I frequently shoot 800.
That's fine and dandy for RP, for the Web and even 4X6's, 5X7's and maybe, just maybe, if the light is good, 8X10's, but have a print made that is larger then that and you will be dissapointed.

/Mitch

Last edited by Mgoldman; 03-29-2007 at 05:17 AM.
Mgoldman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2007, 05:08 AM   #22
Ween
Senior Member
 
Ween's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 4,861
Default

My XT never goes above ISO 400 as that's whan I start to notice noise. I only got to 400 on those late evening, sun-low-in-the-sky shots...
__________________
Ween is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2007, 07:23 PM   #23
JimThias
Senior Member
 
JimThias's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 9,767
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ween
I'll go ISO 200 quite ofter to counteract the wind. The higher ISO allows me to get a higher shutter speed which helps on those gusty days...
Well, I DID say "bright and sunny days."

What lens are you using? I mainly use Canon's 100-400 IS lens with a monopod and IS turned on. I never have any problems with camera shake, when I'm around 400-500 shutter speed. If the sun is shining, I'm usually up around 800-1000 and there's not a whole lot of wind that can introduce camera shake for me.

Even on a windy day at 1/500th, I can avoid camera shake. Check out this shot. Settings were: focal length - 150mm, ISO - 100, shutter speed - 1/500th. Wind: steady at around 30-40 mph.

JimThias is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2007, 07:44 PM   #24
Ween
Senior Member
 
Ween's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 4,861
Default

Quote:
Wind: steady at around 30-40 mph.
Well there's the differece! I can hold in steady wind all day long at my longest focal length of 200mm hand held and not have any problems, but it's when the winds are 15 kts gusting to 30 kts that messes me up! When it's gusty, I like more shutter speed...
__________________
Ween is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2007, 07:53 PM   #25
JimThias
Senior Member
 
JimThias's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 9,767
Default

Well, you are in ND...I suppose the higher winds in the wide open plains can be feel pretty strong.
JimThias is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:10 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.