Old 10-31-2005, 09:03 PM   #1
IC 6071
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Freeport IL
Posts: 197
Send a message via Yahoo to IC 6071
Default Different Questions About Night Shots!

Hi everyone! I have a question about how to get sharp, vivid night shots. Do you use a spot light, car headlights street lights or what. When ever i snap something at night, it always comes out blurry. Thanks!
-Adam
p.s. An example of what I mean, this is one of my all time favorites!

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=122947
__________________
Click on the link to see my pics.
http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?userid=7913

May the CCP the WC and the IC LIVE ON
IC 6071 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2005, 09:06 PM   #2
SD70MAC
HOBO
 
SD70MAC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 371
Default

I always wondered what he uses. I surely cant see that big of a flash going off. Scare the crew half to death.
SD70MAC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2005, 09:31 PM   #3
BNSF_SD40-2B
Senior Member
 
BNSF_SD40-2B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Illinios
Posts: 308
Send a message via Yahoo to BNSF_SD40-2B
Default

Maybe you could e-mail Gary Knapp and ask him how he does it.
__________________
RP.net pix
BNSF_SD40-2B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2005, 10:12 PM   #4
cmherndon
Banned
 
cmherndon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Lawrenceburg, KY
Posts: 883
Send a message via AIM to cmherndon Send a message via Yahoo to cmherndon
Default

Lighting is always the key. If the train is moving, you'll need more light and a faster shutter speed that if it were still. When the train is still, you can sometimes use the ambient light and still get halfway decent results. I know a few people who've actually used a Mag-Lite on a time exposure.

A few I've done using ambient light.

Image ©
PhotoID:
Photograph ©
Image ©
PhotoID:
Photograph ©


Image ©
PhotoID:
Photograph ©
The train is blurry, but this is the effect I wanted.

Just remember to stay away from mercury vapor lights, or you'll get a photo that looks something like this:

http://www.cmherndon.com/photos/t19nightvision.JPG

For flash units, you might want to check out www.alienbees.com.
cmherndon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2005, 10:38 PM   #5
hoydie17
We Own The Night...
 
hoydie17's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Centreville, VA
Posts: 799
Send a message via AIM to hoydie17 Send a message via Yahoo to hoydie17
Default

I can't necessarily speak for Gary Knapp, but I know that in many cases, the folks that use flashbulbs are often very well connected within the RR community. So in some cases there is a little of "unofficial" coordination with crews on certain trains.

To use flashbulbs like that is not a 5 minute setup, it often takes several hours, and tons of patience, trial and error. I shot my first flashbulb shots this past weekend on the Potomac Eagle, and needless to say, when you get the proper setup, it's a very rewarding experience.

Image ©
PhotoID:
Photograph ©

Image ©
PhotoID:
Photograph ©


Next issue is the cost, as I was told, flashbulbs are approaching the $4.00 per piece range now. And when you figure you have to change the bulbs each time you fire them, it can get pricey. Therefore, proper planning is imperative.

I'm obviously not an authority on this subject, but based on what I saw this past weekend, this isn't just the kind of thing to venture into lightly. It takes significant amounts of money, hard work, and time.

Peter Furnee says it best, "Flash Photography at night isn't just photography, it's a production."

Sean
__________________
See my work on FLICKR: Night Stalker Photo Works on FLICKR

Or if you want to see my work here at RP.net? Click here.

"It's just a damn train son!"
hoydie17 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2005, 10:58 PM   #6
StL-rail
Senior Member
 
StL-rail's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Hastings, MN
Posts: 308
Send a message via AIM to StL-rail Send a message via MSN to StL-rail Send a message via Yahoo to StL-rail
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cmherndon
Just remember to stay away from mercury vapor lights
Actually, merc's are your friend, its sodium lighting that you want to avoid, because they cast an ugly orange glow on everything. Caleb, the green tint in your photo is most likely the camera getting a bad white balance reading. Normally mercury lights put out a nice whiteish-blue light that tends to give everything a natural color. The green could have also been caused by a old plastic refractor (they sometimes turn a green color), correct me if I am wrong anywhere here Pat. You know much more than I do.

Examples:
Image © John Witthaus
PhotoID: 119224
Photograph © John Witthaus

Sodium Lighting (notice the orange tint)

Image © John Witthaus
PhotoID: 119124
Photograph © John Witthaus

Mercury Lighting (notice the natural colors)
__________________
John

Click Here to view my photos at RailPictures.Net!

-Canadian Pacific Conductor
-Union Pacific Conductor
-RRC Switchman

Last edited by StL-rail; 11-01-2005 at 12:09 AM.
StL-rail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2005, 03:40 AM   #7
4kV
Senior Member
 
4kV's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Homeless, alcoholic drifter with no permanent address
Posts: 653
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by StL-rail
Actually, merc's are your friend, its sodium lighting that you want to avoid, because they cast an ugly orange glow on everything. Caleb, the green tint in your photo is most likely the camera getting a bad white balance reading. Normally mercury lights put out a nice whiteish-blue light that tends to give everything a natural color. The green could have also been caused by a old plastic refractor (they sometimes turn a green color), correct me if I am wrong anywhere here Pat. You know much more than I do.
Well, not really. I'm not a photographer, I just play one on the internet. I'm merely a doof with a digital camera. The plastic refractor in question should not be a problem. They turn a yellow color, but that is rare. The issue is this. I asked a friend of mine who, amoung other things, lists HID (High Intensity Discharge) lamps as his hobby. Mercs are included in this category. Here is what he writes:

It has to do with the fact that on a camera's CCD (photo chip) there are two green sensors for every red and blue sensor. Since the spectrum has that one strong green line that is not immediately surronded by any other strong spectral lines the camera sees it as green because it does not have any lines to compare it to. True, a merc light looks whitish blue, but it does have green and red in it as well.

Anyway, it is the camera picking up mainly on the green part of a mercury light's spectrum. White balance setting on the camera and a little photoshop will do the trick.
__________________
WTFWDD

Click on n691lf.rrpicturearchives.net for a good laugh and waste of your time.
4kV is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.