Old 03-22-2008, 12:43 AM   #1
Peter MacCauley
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Default Exposures longer than 30 sec.

This question is aimed at Canon users who are a bit more familiar with their camera than i am. If i am shooting with my Rebel XTi, can i take exposures longer than 30 seconds (30 sec is the longest the camera allows). I have seen some really neat ones recently (Sean Hoyden had a great one, http://www.railpictures.net/viewphot...xif=1#exifshow ) and am wondering if i can duplicate the result, though not necessarily at Horseshoe Curve. Does it have to do with mirror lockup? Is it even possible with a crop-sensor body, or just on full-frame cameras? Any thoughts would be much appreciated. Thanks,

Peter.
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Old 03-22-2008, 12:54 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter MacCauley
This question is aimed at Canon users who are a bit more familiar with their camera than i am. If i am shooting with my Rebel XTi, can i take exposures longer than 30 seconds (30 sec is the longest the camera allows). I have seen some really neat ones recently (Sean Hoyden had a great one, http://www.railpictures.net/viewphot...xif=1#exifshow ) and am wondering if i can duplicate the result, though not necessarily at Horseshoe Curve. Does it have to do with mirror lockup? Is it even possible with a crop-sensor body, or just on full-frame cameras? Any thoughts would be much appreciated. Thanks,

Peter.
Buy yourself a remote switch - the modern day cable release (A Canon RS-60E3 is probably what you're looking for), and then set the shutter speed to 'bulb'.
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Old 03-22-2008, 12:56 AM   #3
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I don't have a Canon, but you should be able to do a much longer exposure on any dSLR, certainly a Rebel. Look for the "bulb" setting. You may need a cable release or remote to use it this way though.
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Old 03-22-2008, 02:01 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Callufrax
Buy yourself a remote switch - the modern day cable release (A Canon RS-60E3 is probably what you're looking for), and then set the shutter speed to 'bulb'.
I concur. That remote also has a button lock so you can let go of it if you want. As far as I know, the shutter will stay open as long as you want. I don't think there is any limit...other than the batteries dying.

Peter, turn on your camera, set it to manual and roll the dial until the shutter goes to "bulb" (as mentioned). You've now arrived at an indefinite shutter speed, controlled by YOU. But a remote is highly recommended, and I also recommend the mirror lock up mode while using longer exposures. Anything to help eliminate camera shake is the key.

Last edited by JimThias; 03-22-2008 at 02:04 AM.
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Old 03-22-2008, 02:02 AM   #5
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Peter,

As has already been stated, you need to get a cable release and set your shutter setting to bulb. The "port" for the cable release should be on the left side of the camera if you are looking at the back of the camera. Once you have the release and the camera set to bulb, you can hold the shutter open as long as you'd like.

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Old 03-22-2008, 07:22 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darryl Rule
Peter,

As has already been stated, you need to get a cable release and set your shutter setting to bulb. The "port" for the cable release should be on the left side of the camera if you are looking at the back of the camera. Once you have the release and the camera set to bulb, you can hold the shutter open as long as you'd like.

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Old 03-22-2008, 01:07 PM   #7
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Peter,

I too, shoot with the XTi. And, like you, I asked about exposures over 30 seconds.

As mentioned, you need to switch to the Bulb setting. Go to the Manual (M) setting and rotate the "wheel" (sorry, can't think of the actual term) by the shutter button until you reach the last setting which is "Bulb". You'll then be ready to create an exposure length of whatever you wish.

Also as mentioned, the cable release and tripod are essential.

Good luck and happy railfanning!

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Old 03-22-2008, 02:28 PM   #8
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Thanks, all. After some experimenting and reading all of what has been said, this is all making a lot more sense! I should have mentioned that i have the cable release and a tripod. In Manual mode, does the camera set the aperture automatically ? (don't have the manual at hand). The suggestion of mirror lockup makes a lot of sense, so as to eliminate camera shake. Thanks!

Peter.
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Old 03-22-2008, 03:00 PM   #9
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Peter, Manual means just that, you have to set everything. The shot you referenced was 143 seconds long at ISO 200 and F/4. You probably will need to take a bunch of test shots and have some idea of how long you will need to keep the shutter open for the effect that you want. Pick the lowest ISO that will work, to keep the noise down. Make sure auto focus is off as well. You will probably have to focus off the distance scale on your lens.

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Old 03-25-2008, 02:34 PM   #10
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Bulb setting, cable release and tripod - as already mentioned. In the case of the tripod get a good one - read solid and heavy! Manfrotto make reasonably priced (semi expensive) quality ones.

Reason for a good tripod is if you graduate to using telephoto lenses that are large (400mm +, or a Macro lens with flash) you do not have to get another tripod as a quality one will support the weight.
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