Old 12-21-2013, 03:21 PM   #1
Ron Flanary
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Way, way back in 1978, I had a used Nikkormat 35mm camera I shot with for a few months. Initially, it did great. But then somewhere something happened to the internal light meter. On one particular outing on the L&N, I got all kinds of screwy readings. I should have trusted my instincts and used exposure settings off the "poop sheet" in the film box, since it was essentially a sunny day most of the time.

I kept the slides all these years---but why, I don't know. I pulled one of the worst ones from the group to see if I could Photoshop it into an image RP.net would accept. Yes, it was accepted!

Here's the slide---scanned "as is":



And---after I did quite a bit of work to restore the image:

Attached Images
File Type: jpg 1.jpg (159.6 KB, 331 views)
File Type: jpg 2.jpg (138.8 KB, 322 views)

Last edited by Ron Flanary; 12-21-2013 at 03:26 PM.
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Old 12-21-2013, 03:49 PM   #2
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And people bash the software as enabling people to become "fakes."

Nice save there boss!
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Old 12-21-2013, 04:15 PM   #3
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Jeez, Ron, that looks pretty good. Lol.
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Old 12-21-2013, 04:41 PM   #4
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Amazing work, Ron... I've had a couple saves myself, but I think yours is more extreme than I have pulled off yet.
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Old 12-21-2013, 05:05 PM   #5
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That is some really nice work there. Is that your truck? lol. Looks a little bit close.
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Old 12-21-2013, 05:13 PM   #6
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That is some really nice work there. Is that your truck? lol. Looks a little bit close.
No, that's not my truck. I just noticed it WAS parked a little too close for good clearance.
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Old 12-21-2013, 05:44 PM   #7
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I have a roll of Super 8 Film that is as bad as your original slide (maybe even slightly worse). It is of GG1s, MP54s, E44s, and E33s on the Northeast Corridor in 1976. I have kept it 100% in the hope that one day I'll be able to fix it. As I didn't shoot movies much (almost none) it doesn't pay for me to buy a program for just one roll though.
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Old 12-21-2013, 07:25 PM   #8
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Ron, amazing recovery on that!
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Old 12-21-2013, 07:51 PM   #9
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Ron,

Great save. I kept my "duds" in yellow boxes in a bottom drawer for years. Some really neat stuff going back to 1971. When I moved in 1992, I took them all out to the trash barrel behind the house, set them on fire, drank a beer and watched them burn. Oh, how I regret that night.

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Old 12-22-2013, 02:04 AM   #10
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Ron,

Great save. I kept my "duds" in yellow boxes in a bottom drawer for years. Some really neat stuff going back to 1971. When I moved in 1992, I took them all out to the trash barrel behind the house, set them on fire, drank a beer and watched them burn. Oh, how I regret that night.

Stan
Of course when I got those slides back from Kodak in 1978, I immediately thought, "....well, I'll just save these until I can digitally scan them and use some image manipulation software on my home computer to restore the image to something approximating the way it actually was..."

Sure.
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Old 12-22-2013, 02:08 AM   #11
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Nicely done Ron. Even slide film has a fair bit of exposure latitude when scanned. But back in the day there was no way to recover it.
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Old 12-23-2013, 05:47 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Ron Flanary View Post
Of course when I got those slides back from Kodak in 1978, I immediately thought, "....well, I'll just save these until I can digitally scan them and use some image manipulation software on my home computer to restore the image to something approximating the way it actually was..."

Sure.
Well, if you had gotten it "right" in the camera way back then, you wouldn't have had to save it after all these years.

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Old 12-24-2013, 04:27 AM   #13
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Well, if you had gotten it "right" in the camera way back then, you wouldn't have had to save it after all these years.

You're so, so right, Jim. And...after all these years, I still can't get the hang of it.

Seriously: color slide film was totally unforgiving. If you missed the exposure half an f-stop this way or that...tough luck. Lots of photographers used motor drives (I think I got one about 1980) so they could bracket shots. It was pretty wasteful, but if the shot before you was a "must-have," you might close the aperture a stop, and then roll it around to one stop brighter than the exposure you thought might be correct as you pressed the shutter (and tried to maintain level and manual focus at the same time). Depending on the speed of your motor drive (and how much money you were willing to waste on film and processing), you might end up with five or six slides---and maybe two of them would be optimum.

Today, of course, you just get "close," and use digital software to correct it. And yes...that also applied to "leveling" issues. If it was unlevel when you shot it---it would be unlevel for all eternity.

Today's photography is the equivalent of pressing the "Easy" button.
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Old 12-24-2013, 04:36 AM   #14
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You're so, so right, Jim. And...after all these years, I still can't get the hang of it.

Seriously: color slide film was totally unforgiving. If you missed the exposure half an f-stop this way or that...tough luck. Lots of photographers used motor drives (I think I got one about 1980) so they could bracket shots. It was pretty wasteful, but if the shot before you was a "must-have," you might close the aperture a stop, and then roll it around to one stop brighter than the exposure you thought might be correct as you pressed the shutter (and tried to maintain level and manual focus at the same time). Depending on the speed of your motor drive (and how much money you were willing to waste on film and processing), you might end up with five or six slides---and maybe two of them would be optimum.

Today, of course, you just get "close," and use digital software to correct it. And yes...that also applied to "leveling" issues. If it was unlevel when you shot it---it would be unlevel for all eternity.

Today's photography is the equivalent of pressing the "Easy" button.
Really more and more true of just about everything. Cars slow down now if there's an accident ahead or an object behind. They parallel park themselves. I could go on about almost anything and how it's become so much easier but I'm a lazy person and to be frank, Google lets you look it all up now (yeah, I grew up when you'd ask a question and no one would know the answer - can you imagine?).
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Old 12-24-2013, 06:00 AM   #15
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I dunno, once I dumped my Minolta manual center weighted - manual focus cameras and got some Nikon auto focus - matrix metered cameras - it wasn't all that tough to expose film and get shots in focus. Film wasn't really all that hard - the biggest difference going to later versions of digital cameras was going from 50 ISO to whatever crazy ISO I need to get the shot.
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Old 12-24-2013, 01:53 PM   #16
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Today's photography is the equivalent of pressing the "Easy" button.
Except that along with the higher ease comes a higher standard, the bar is raised. All the work that one used to do to get the shot right is now done in post processing. Oh, sure, your basic sunlit wedgie just takes a few seconds, but anything with more questionable light or any number of other special circumstances, and it can take a bunch of computer time and a special skillset to get it done.

And to think that in the old days post-processing meant nothing more than opening the slide box that came back from the developer. Easy times!
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Old 12-24-2013, 04:56 PM   #17
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I think the biggest obstacle was probably K-25 film. But it still looks great 50 years later.
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