Old 07-18-2005, 02:14 AM   #1
IC 6071
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Default Soft

I don't understand what soft, or unsharp means. Can someone please point it out to me on this one? Thanks alot!



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Old 07-18-2005, 02:35 AM   #2
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It means the image isnt sharp. Try sharpening it in an editor.
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Old 07-18-2005, 02:43 AM   #3
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The photo content (Loco) looks sharp to me. I see the background is soft, or unsharpened. The photo also looks like some image quality was lost due to editing, or re-saving. You might appeal it, or try to take your original photo and sharpen it up just a tad before re-saving.
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Old 07-18-2005, 02:50 AM   #4
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Soft or unsharpened means your photo is fuzzy or appears out of focus. To correct this, sharpen (but not too much) before you resize. Once you resize, do a very lite sharpening and then you are ready to go. Your photos will appear much clearer to you and the viewers

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Old 07-18-2005, 03:33 AM   #5
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Thanks alot! This rookie needs all of the help he can get!
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Old 07-18-2005, 05:23 AM   #6
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I might be late on this . . . but the front plow is SHARP . . . the rear trucks are very soft. This is a DOF (Depth of Field) problem, and may not be saved and or repaired by USM (unsharp mask) as the front will be over sharp and the rear does, or may not have enough detail to make a correct image.

I am guessing that this was shot with a low f/stop number, if this was your intent then you achieved it. If it was not then a slower shutter speed and a higher f/stop number will serve you well in your future endeavors. Get and use a tripod if you can. Shoot f/8 or so . . . higher if needed. I don't shoot any trains above f/16 but for landscapes I often do so.

Remember, there is no award for whom can hold a camera the stillest, just for clean, clear, sharp photographs. Your work looks good to me and I think you will have a good time in this hobby, you seem to have a knack for same.
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Old 07-19-2005, 12:04 AM   #7
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Default Spot sharpening

I don't know how many photo editing programs allow you to select a specific area of a photo to enhance, but I was turned on to a free, downloadable program called Irfanview http://www.irfanview.com, which will allow you to select a specific area for sharpening. Obviously, you can set the level of sharpening, so you could gradually increase sharpening from the front of the loco to the rear to even out the level of softness/sharpness occuring in the photo, without drastic pixelation.

Aside from that, follow the advise given by RJsorensen regarding F-stop settings. It took me a good while to learn the major affects the F-stop settings have on a photo, especially when you are setting up for close, far away, or zoom shot. It means the difference of major editing, or no editing at all for a well balanced photo.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RJsorensen
I am guessing that this was shot with a low f/stop number, if this was your intent then you achieved it. If it was not then a slower shutter speed and a higher f/stop number will serve you well in your future endeavors. Get and use a tripod if you can. Shoot f/8 or so . . . higher if needed. I don't shoot any trains above f/16 but for landscapes I often do so.
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