Old 09-24-2011, 07:19 AM   #1
Chase55671
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Default Your "Style" of Photography?

I started taking railroad photos roughly five years ago this fall, using a small, limited Kodak point and shoot camera. At the time, I took these images only to document trains, something I had expressed an interest in shortly before. I really didn't read into why or how to take these images, I just simply took them.

Throughout 2007, I found myself still neglecting to follow what I later found out as the photograpgher's "rule of thirds". I had no real artistic value to any of my images, I simply took them to document. It was not until the middle of 2008 that I became interested more so in the photography aspect of the hobby than the actual documentation part.

Joining Railpictures.Net in that time frame, but not submitting consistently until late 2008, I began to give myself a line of standards. I started observing sun angles, composition, and tried to make some effort to avoid cluttered scenes. I enjoyed these challenges and later enjoyed having my images accepted to Railpictures, even if those accepted images were few and far between. Continuing to follow RP.net's photo stream, meeting folks in my region with more experience, and slowly familiarizing myself more and more with photography guidelines and standards, I found myself really intrigued by the hobby and continued to remain very active in photographing and learning.

Purchasing a DSLR in December of 2008 and Adobe Photoshop software, I started a whole new learning curve. Understanding RAW and the capabilities of Photoshop and DSLR's in general, I felt like my last six months of acquiring information and putting it to use was very minimal compared to what I was getting myself into. Spending much of 2009 reading online tutorials, getting a feel for my camera and software, and continuing to communicate with various photographers, I eventually had the basics accomplished. I knew how to compose a photo, I knew the proper settings to document it as my eye saw it, and I knew how to process it.

Giving myself more and more challenges over time, I began to find myself wanting to capture things in a different way. I'm the type of person to become very tired and uninterested in the same pattern. I found my entire photo stream consisting of the same images, in terms of composure and even geographical location. I wasn't satisfied..

To keep my interest, I began giving myself personal challenges to think outside of the box and attempt something that at the time, I considered "creative". With very little success at first, over time I found myself being able to use available light, artificial light, and various elements to my advantage. In the process, I unintentionally started to develop my own style. A style that once again motivated me and gave me the desire to be trackside trying new things. I found this side of me to develop while photographing at night. Not only did I enjoy capturing the photos and the results from various climates, I found myself appreciating my region, the culture I live in, and essentially the railroad that operates through it.

These realizations influenced how I captured a photo and to this day, I like to think that perhaps that stands out among this competitive digital hobby. Railpictures.Net is a prime example of how difficult it is to stand out with easy access to equipment and software, particularly when such a large following are photographing the same subjects.

I also believe that it's a lot easier to stand out in this era when you live in a location that is poorly documented. From an RP.net standpoint, when you think of particular locations, certain photographers immediately come to mind. For an example, when someone mentions railroads in Alaska, I automatically think of Dave Blazejewski. When I think of Northeast Pennsylvania and New Jersey, I think of Andrew Blaszczyk or Mitch Goldman. Dave Honan comes to mind when I think of railroad photography in the Pacific Northwest or John Benner in the Southwest.

Each of these mentioned photographers have a unique style to themselves, evident through their photo streams. Sure, there are some similarities within all of us, but those are simply the guidelines set by Railpictures and your general photography guidelines, however, it's neat to see how others see a scene and the way they like to capture it.

That brings me to the conclusion of this post and ultimately the intent of it.. What is your style of photography and why? What type of mood do you associate with your images, if any?

Why do you shoot them and what makes you stand out? I'm really interested in seeing your replies.

Chase Gunnoe
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Old 09-24-2011, 09:13 AM   #2
Holloran Grade
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Lightbulb What Type of Photog am I?

These types of photos don't really interest me:

Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 374819
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 357448
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 353501
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography



Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 347091
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 350840
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 347094
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography



They are easy to take and look like everyone elses' 3/4 wedgie shots.


I don't dislike them, but for me they lack the wow factor that I strive to capture.

Why did I take them?

Reference shots, challenges with other people to get a pic of a certain site in the DB when no one seems to be able to get one accepted at that location.

And, because people seem to like to look at those types of pictures.

I also like to go to a really whored out spot and see if I can't get something that looks different such as:

Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 350837
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 357268
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 360203
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography


Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 345554
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography



What types of pictures do I like?

Up close shots:

Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 360202
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 354592
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 346965
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography



Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 349122
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 334622
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 375788
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography





I like back lit images:


Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 341492
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 346363
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 324322
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography



Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 320438
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 319541
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 298161
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography




I like the night:


Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 289446
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 299225
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 301044
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography



Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 301175
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 306115
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 362384
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography



Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 348105
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 348769
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 354625
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography




I like buildings:


Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 322373
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 324016
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 325091
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography





I like the abstract:


Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 365374
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 366727
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 358428
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography



Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 317770
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 317435
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 302302
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography



Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 319191
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 357558
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 353505
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography





I like landscapes:


Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 314243
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 295253
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 291513
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography




I like people:


Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 300394
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 296457
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 293346
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography



Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 288951
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 287341
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 310552
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography



Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 311147
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 319893
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 321327
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography



Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 324321
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 326121
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 327035
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography



Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 344528
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 361929
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography
Image © EL ROCO Photography
PhotoID: 334388
Photograph © EL ROCO Photography




And finally, my favorite shot that is not in the DB.

We Walk among You - Following the Bird



So there you have it.

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Old 09-24-2011, 12:24 PM   #3
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I find it hard to answer this, as I do not go out with a certain mind frame about what I'm going to shoot each day. I have nearly every type of shot in the portfolio, I just do not make the public suffer through them all.

I'm just a shooter at heart. I guess if you want a style from what I've made public. I would consider it to be capturing photos in less than perfect light.

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Old 09-24-2011, 03:33 PM   #4
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HG, thanks for thumbnailing just about every shot you have taken in your entire life, plus the one that didn't make RP. Longest post ever, in terms of screen inches if not words!

Chase, I don't shoot enough to have a style, other than anything-but-trackside-wedgie, AKA try-something, AKA look-at-shots-later-and-try-to-figure-out-why-yet-again-they-are-nothing-notreworthy.

But in general, I suspect it is difficult to consciously develop a style; one's style is revealed only after many years go by and one looks back on the images. But then, I am not so familiar with the process of thinking through a shot in terms of style; I basically have a mechanical approach - put the train here, put the secondary (or primary) subject here, how does the sky look, etc. I don't have much of a vision.
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Old 09-24-2011, 03:48 PM   #5
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I live and die by this quote by a friend of mine: "Shoot the scene, not the train." All these 3/4 wedgies with only a train in them do nothing for me. I love shooting locations with older signals, curves, grain elevators, barns, and any kind of cool looking building. Some examples:

Image © Redhawk - Wyatt Heilman
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Photograph © Redhawk - Wyatt Heilman

Image © Redhawk - Wyatt Heilman
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Photograph © Redhawk - Wyatt Heilman

Image © Redhawk - Wyatt Heilman
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Photograph © Redhawk - Wyatt Heilman

Image © Redhawk - Wyatt Heilman
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Photograph © Redhawk - Wyatt Heilman

Image © Redhawk - Wyatt Heilman
PhotoID: 371728
Photograph © Redhawk - Wyatt Heilman

Image © Redhawk - Wyatt Heilman
PhotoID: 370060
Photograph © Redhawk - Wyatt Heilman

Image © Redhawk
PhotoID: 368269
Photograph © Redhawk

Image © Redhawk
PhotoID: 364837
Photograph © Redhawk

Image © Redhawk
PhotoID: 359085
Photograph © Redhawk

Image © Redhawk
PhotoID: 340880
Photograph © Redhawk

Image © Redhawk
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Old 09-24-2011, 04:45 PM   #6
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I guess my goal is similar to wyatt's. I like the way railroading has shaped the culture, history, design, architecture...how it has altered the physical landscape. how it fits into cityscapes. I don't find locomotives that interesting unless they are powered by steam or are covered wagons. Growing up I used to look through my dad's picture books and magazines...therefore I prefer the "look" of film.

unfortunately...
1) I don't have the time necessary to truly develop my craft/style
2) I'm not that good (but hopefully improving)
3) I don't have the patience to go back to the same spot over and over to nail just the right shot. I'm more of an explorer than a perfectionist.
4) I typically have a four-year old by my side which is kind of limiting.
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Old 09-24-2011, 04:57 PM   #7
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Well, Chase...I did things in a bit of a different order from you. Started out taking shots to document trains, but that didn't last long at all - I went straight from not knowing how to use a camera to trying to be the best photographer in western Canada, following the footsteps of Nick Morant. Unfortunately, had no idea how to handle my film, so by the time I joined RP I had a collection of shots from about a year prior, and they ALL GOT REJECTED! (Mostly because I scanned them at school and uploaded them after resizing in MS Paint)
I didn't get photoshop until a couple years ago, I was working with only contrast and saturation adjustments on jpeg files until I shot my first raw file back in 2008. The big turning point for me was getting a digital camera and suddenly not having odd blurs and washed out colours like I'd come to expect from film (Though it was mostly cheap scanning and cheap lenses)
From then on, I didn't really have a vision anymore. I just take crappy photos that I care less and less about, and I've never had more than a 50% acceptance rate here. Maybe somebody thinks of me as the defining figure in modern Canadian Rockies railway photography, but I doubt they're in a stable state of mind.
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Old 09-24-2011, 05:41 PM   #8
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I would heartily argue the point that the Northwest is "poorly documented." Active photogs like Martin Burwash, Steve Eshom, Ross Fotheringham, Bruce Kelly, Tim Repp, Dale Sanders and Robert Scott (to name an extremely small sample), not to mention pioneers such as Richard Steinheimer, had been doing amazing stuff out here for years and years before I stumbled into Seattle at the beginning of 2006. I appreciate that Chase associates my name with this region, but I am certainly not the defining photog out here -- there's just no way anyone can make that claim.

My primary style is much more about depicting the place through which railroads run than simply documenting the train; the train is the purpose for capturing the photo, but the objective is to show the railroad in the greater context of its environment. This has been evident from my very first photo posted at RP:

Image © David Honan
PhotoID: 269311
Photograph © David Honan


Why this style? I am by trade a civil engineer, and I tend to look at the world from that perspective; I enjoy creating photos that express the challenges railroads had to overcome when attempting to construct a line between points A and B, whether they're impressive works of engineering...

Image © David Honan
PhotoID: 342992
Photograph © David Honan

Image © David Honan
PhotoID: 336663
Photograph © David Honan

Image © David Honan
PhotoID: 357800
Photograph © David Honan


...or simply evidence of thoughtful alignment routing:

Image © David Honan
PhotoID: 298702
Photograph © David Honan

Image © David Honan
PhotoID: 369362
Photograph © David Honan


I'm also a big fan of finding ways to use ambient light to create night scenes (Chase and I have traded numerous emails over the last few years as he was developing his technique), with heartfelt thanks to Ross F. for giving me a kick in this direction. Some examples (excluding the obvious bridge shot because I expect everyone's bored with it by now):

Image © David Honan
PhotoID: 331292
Photograph © David Honan

Image © David Honan
PhotoID: 277041
Photograph © David Honan

Image © David Honan
PhotoID: 364604
Photograph © David Honan


Something I want to throw back at Chase: Why do you refer to railroad photography as "this competitive digital hobby"? Is there some sort of contest inherent with posting one's work online? Is there some sort of necessary drive to be the best, the most respected, the most popular, have the highest view counts, or achieve some other measure of arbitrarily-defined success?
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Old 09-24-2011, 07:07 PM   #9
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I don't know what exactly the intent of the thread is other than to incite discussion, which is fine. I think personally, I don't know if I have a "style" per se. In terms of photography, I really only in the past 5 years have begun to take what some of you would consider "serious" photos. It's arguable that I am even at that point. Prior to that, the hobby was 100% about the enjoyment of watching trains, finding unique railfanning locations and to some very small degree, the social aspect. Although in recent years, I have been turned off by the influx of what I call "extreme railfans" and their kids.

I am and always have been a big history buff. And to some degree, trains and railroading up until the past 10-15 years have been very much "stuck in the past" for lack of a better term. Lots of neat artifacts such as old bridges, water towers, signals, depots and other structures. Not to mention old locomotives and rolling stock.

In the past decade, CSX and NS (the 2 major railroads in my area) have seemed to wage a jihad against history in terms of old railroad infrastructure. I have taken to some point to document as much of it as I can. I realize I am very late, in a lot of cases too late to the game and live very far from the areas I am most interested in (mainly the N&W between Roanoke and Williamson, and the C&O between Clifton Forge and Montgomery) to do a thorough job in documenting it. People like Jeff Hawkins and even Chase and Loyd are in a position to do a much better job of this than me and have done a great job in doing so.

But this is really not a goal or aim. In terms of my approach to photos, I have tried in recent months to get away from the wedgie, unfortunately when you live in a flat, tree-riddled state like I do, creativity options are limited IMHO. I would prefer to drive several hundred miles a few times a year to take pictures in photogenic areas than shoot the same spots here. So in that regard, I am similar to Wyatt. I also work a lot, I get 1, maybe 2 days a week to shoot. Throw in bad weather, and other obligations and I could go weeks without getting the camera out. It is what it is.

And I agree with David, this is not competitive for me, although I see this alot these days. When I do, I just get out of the way and find another spot. Here locally, there are a few locations that have been absolutely ruined by this, and I refuse to go anymore unless I can get a weekday off and I know that element will not be there.

Rant over

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Old 09-24-2011, 07:49 PM   #10
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Dave,

I suppose I should've added that it's a lot easier to stand out when a location is poorly documented, but not including the Pacific Northwest into that category. I suppose I should've also added how it can be difficult to stand out even more when you have numerous photographers in the same region. That brings in a whole new series of questions and neat comparisons to see how a group of photographers capture scenes in their own ways. This type of stuff is also interesting to compare at photo charters.

In this particular thread, I'm looking to discuss who stands out only in the RP community, because frankly, I have more experience with RP.net and their role in railroad photography. I'd like to expand that to CRPA and Kalmbach, etc. I'm working on it!

That said, I'll stand by my statement that you stand out when I think of the Pacific Northwest, simply from a Railpictures standpoint. When looking at books published in that region or articles submitted to magazines, other names certainly do come to mind, however from sharing images online, you stand out.

And to answer your final question, I don't really read into that much. I don't look as RP.net as a personal challenge to be the best, most respected, etc. In my opinion, that's a little over the top. I do, however, look at Railpictures as being competitive. I suppose it simply varies on the intentions of different contributors. Are you simply content with submitting photos? I personally look at the award system to be a great example of what I'm trying to explain.

A modern day image really has to stand out to "wow" the crowd. By competitive, I'm looking at it from an equipment/software standpoint. In this day and age where technology is so advanced, everyone is on the same level and you really have to work harder (IMO) to stand out and be creative. I even think that attempting to be creative is really even pushing digital over the top at times, especially with these night exposures or shooting in less than ideal weather conditions.

Chase
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Old 09-25-2011, 10:24 AM   #11
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- deleted -

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Old 09-26-2011, 05:10 AM   #12
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My interest has settled on light. How it works, interaction/reaction, reflection, contrasts, colors, changes, etc... and put the information I have gathered from studies to use. I tend to avoid the standard, well lit wedge shot unless the subject is interesting or it's the only option. Frankly, having over 10 years on the railroad, modern equipment just doesn't interest me, thus my interest in light. Strong glint, silhouettes, low light all hide the "cookie-cutter-seen-one-seen-them-all" aspect of modern locomotives.

Photography is like a puzzle, lots of thought involved to align all the pieces. Light, angle, composition, focal point, lens, aperture, iso, exposure, shutter timing etc... That's what keeps me interested in railroad photography and creates what you call my "style."

Image © Joe Gartman
PhotoID: 375926
Photograph © Joe Gartman


Image © Joe Gartman
PhotoID: 374037
Photograph © Joe Gartman


Image © Joe Gartman
PhotoID: 373551
Photograph © Joe Gartman


Image © Joe Gartman
PhotoID: 370703
Photograph © Joe Gartman


Image © Joe Gartman
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Photograph © Joe Gartman
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Old 09-26-2011, 05:25 AM   #13
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Interesting thread. I find myself repeating some of the comments already said here.

I joined RP in late 2006. Prior to that, I frequently railfanned with my dad around here and he had been on the site for a year or so (iirc); therefore I think I tried to copy his shooting style at first, although I obviously learned he hadn't even developed his completely at that time. That gave me room to experiment. Eventually his career took him away from home more often and then ultimately led to him moving across the state, so I therefore tried to develop my own style. Admittedly I also don't know specifically how to describe it. I can get up one morning and feel in the mood to get a specific photo to show a new scene or one in a different way, or I can just feel like I want to go out and shoot some trains. For me the most or least interesting train can bring out the most or least of my creativity. I feel like routine operations deserve to be shown as just that, routine. And yet at some point or another, there will be that one-of-a-kind movement that needs to be caught at a certain spot, at whatever cost . Regarding the former, upon looking at Chase's gallery, I was pleased to see this one show up at the top:

Image © Chase Gunnoe
PhotoID: 376028
Photograph © Chase Gunnoe


At that location, that is obviously a typical scene, and needs to be documented as such. There's a lot of that around here. And yet, over time, as things change, locations need to be documented. Back in May 2009, I remember seeing this work train pull in, and knowing exactly where I had to get a photo of it:

Image © Carl Becker
PhotoID: 283242
Photograph © Carl Becker


That water tower would later be demolished, and I doubted at the time that the SD40-2s would wear the same numbers if even remain on BN much longer (oddly enough, the 8012 has). But that photo meant more to me than just shooting a train; it was capturing something that was unique, and, in this case, not replaceable.

In their own ways, I guess then, I come to appreciate each type of train and photo op in its own way - whether it's just shooting trains or documenting something special. IMO, if a Dash 9 is sitting by itself in good light, it deserves a photo. Yet when something unique happens, it feels good to know I just caught something unique. It's all case by case.

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Old 09-26-2011, 05:53 AM   #14
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Carl,

Interesting. I agree with your comments that sometimes it is best to capture a routing move in a routine fashion. Sometimes there are simply no other options and capturing something in a simple fashion is ultimately the best way to show the scene.

Mood, light, etc. bring out the creativity in a lot of us I feel, especially with composition. It's neat to hear stories from other contributors and get a feel for how they capture their scenes.

Chase
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Old 09-27-2011, 02:18 AM   #15
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I'm not sure if I have a style really, but a picture is worth a thousand words so heres a few thousand.
To me the ideal shot is a great train with great scenery with great light with the train and scenery balanced and playing an equally important role in the composition. Of course the times that I actually get such a shot is somewhat rare.
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Living in the city I love urban scenery, whether its abandoned warehouses or towering skyscrapers.
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I love bridges, metal ones, wooden trestles, pretty much anything except the dreadful highway style concrete ones.
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I love shortlines, classic power and quaint rural scenery. Also for the simple fact that many of these lines are hanging on by a thread, who knows what the future holds for them and these shots will likely be more valuable for future generations then the same old class 1 stuff. I could go on posting shortline pictures in this thread but ill restrain myself.

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Sometimes there are trains that are good enough that I do not worry about the surrounding scene. I do always prefer though to shoot good trains with interesting scenery.
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Some times the scene is more compelling than the train and I shoot that way.
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I like getting those hard to get angles that no one has ever gotten before (or atleast posted), nothing like discovering an awesome shot that no one else has done.
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I guess this is more of what I like as a railfan than as a photographer.
In terms of photography I am fairly traditional, I like the sun behind my back, clouds scare me, and generally the train is the main focus of my shots. I do like glints, fog can be interesting and storms can produce some neat images. I love telephoto shots especially with the big waves of heat coming off hard working diesels, I like scenic wide angles, I'm not big on night shots but do enjoy shooting parked trains at night.
Things I dont like
-Shots where the train is out of focus and something irrelevant is in focus.
-Ultra artistic shots of rare consists, shots that defeat the purpose of having a good train.
- Pieces of paper in windows
So essentially I'm the kind of guy that likes variety in terms of trains, scenery and angles, but not so much into trying to be overly creative with photo techniques.

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Old 09-27-2011, 01:40 PM   #16
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I like trains and I take pictures of them.

Sometimes I've a plan, but railroads have their own and often fail to consider mine; mostly I just sit and read a book trackside, shooting whatever comes by. I like to think I capture little eras on the mainline, and anyone that has shot for 10 or more years can look at their work and see what I mean. To me, this view from a historical aspect is the main motivator as change happens so fast, and is often unremarked. The only systematic work I do is shooting CP's Havelock Sub, most of which never sees the light of day, and is rooted in a desire to capture the essence of a class 1 branchline operation before change sweeps away anything that remains familiar.

I've no interest in becoming a great photographer... too much like work and that'd ruin the enjoyment.
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Old 09-27-2011, 10:26 PM   #17
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Well I guess I missed a prime opportunity to whore the album out..

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Old 09-27-2011, 11:27 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trainboysd40 View Post
Maybe somebody thinks of me as the defining figure in modern Canadian Rockies railway photography, but I doubt they're in a stable state of mind.


I would like to see my style defined by scenics.
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Old 09-28-2011, 12:48 AM   #19
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I always like to be styling when I'm shooting.
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Old 09-28-2011, 12:55 AM   #20
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Don't worry, Loyd... we still think of you as a whore... (kidding)

I would call my style Zelig - I frankly adapt to what I see others in the field are doing, or I see something on line, in a magazine, or in a book, and think, I should try that. This doesn't make me very creative, but it does allow me to take photos that I think are pretty cool even if I don't quite have the eye or immediate ability to size up and fame a scene as others might more instincually.
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Old 09-28-2011, 12:56 AM   #21
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I always like to be styling when I'm shooting.
Me too, in fact, this is my railfan vehicle

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Old 09-28-2011, 12:57 AM   #22
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I'm just a slut Charles, as I do not receive compensation for it

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Old 09-28-2011, 01:19 AM   #23
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What is your style of photography and why?

That's a very BIG question. I wish there was a list or something that I could chose an answer from but of course I can't and what I could come up with in the 30 seconds I just gave myself to pick an answer is a "What Else is There?" style. As for why, because everyone knows what a train (insert any other subject here) looks like up close but what about the WHEREs or HOWs or WHYs of it. I am always looking to tell the story with whatever is around.

What type of mood do you associate with your images, if any?

If I can bring the viewer into the scene and make them feel like they are watching, feeling and experiencing the same thing I did at that time then I have succeeded. Obviously, mood varies depending on the type of photo, location, weather, etc.

Why do you shoot them and what makes you stand out?

I guess looking back at my railfan photography I can almost credit O. Winston Link for my "style", which, not surprisingly, is similar (although very different at the same time). His N&W steam project was exactly that, a project in which he wanted to document the end of steam in that time period. A mix of cultural happenings as well as industry happenings. I learned that when I did a report on him for my high school photography class back in 2004. Ever since then as well as getting advice from others I have been attempting to do that but with some twists and variations.

I have found that my style also varies depending on my mood or the situation that I am put into. Sometimes I will be a documentarist shooting rosters of an SD45-2 in perfect light or sometimes I will be the artist stretching the limitations of light. Once in a while, the stars will align and I can combine the two which is the ideal situation for me; catching that rare move or scene in light that is hard or impossible to duplicate.

I would love to take on projects and see them through to the end but I have such an eclectic taste in subjects and styles that its hard for me to stay on track. That being said, my being a railfan is sometimes a bad thing. I can't ignore or sacrifice that steam special in October to stay home and shoot fall foliage along the NJT here as much as I want to.

I will also give credit to my brother for my "style". Probably 75% of my photos not only on RP but in my collection have been taken at the same location of the same train on the same day as him. I had to develop "an eye" in order to prevent standing shoulder to shoulder getting the same thing especially when chasing the same thing for 4 days. That would get old quick. If it weren't for him, I may not have starting taking a chance on a different angle and I may be in a continuous 3/4 wedgie loop.
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Old 09-28-2011, 01:34 AM   #24
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Nice ride, Troy. But you need some bling-bling with your gear for street cred... my Nikon



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Old 09-28-2011, 01:39 AM   #25
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Loyd,

Based on Troy and Mike's most recent posts, I think they may be able to offer you some protection and a place to crash.

CF
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