Old 05-15-2015, 09:55 PM   #1
Mgoldman
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Default Lightroom Preset Preferences?

Curious - for those using Adobe's Lightroom program -

What preferences do you use (specifically "External Editing") and why?

I've had the program for a year or two but only just started using it.

It is preset for "Procolor" vs sRGB which had blue skies appear purple on my I-Phone despite showing a blue sky on my desktop and laptop. This was fixed by converting the color profile later on. Another fix would be simply to set the preference to sRGB.

It suggests saving files as a Tiff being better then PSD and 240 dpi vs 300 dpi. If you use Tiff, do you compress the files? If so, which method and why?

Thoughts?

/Mitch
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Old 05-19-2015, 07:52 PM   #2
KevinM
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Hi Mitch,
  • What preferences do you use (specifically "External Editing") and why?
    When I am absolutely done editing an image in LR, I will typically export it as a TIFF and have LR open that TIFF in PSE 12. That's because PSE has tools that LR does not have. For instance, if you need to clone out a stray foamer arm, or something like that, you really need PS or PSE. The LR cloning tools are better than they used to be, but are still not very flexible.
  • It is preset for "Procolor" vs sRGB which had blue skies appear purple on my I-Phone despite showing a blue sky on my desktop and laptop. This was fixed by converting the color profile later on. Another fix would be simply to set the preference to sRGB.
    I always export in sRGB, because that's what RP recommends, and also some publishers like that color space as well. No idea what "Procolor" is.
  • It suggests saving files as a Tiff being better then PSD and 240 dpi vs 300 dpi. If you use Tiff, do you compress the files? If so, which method and why?
    I export to TIFF, because that is the format I am familiar and comfortable with. No other reason, really. Here's the thing. I only export when I intend to do something with the image. Until then, there is no reason to export and save anything. As I have indicated to you before, the biggest advantage that LR has over other programs is that never have to SAVE. If you are up late some night, and you cannot get a shot looking right, you can just shut down and go back to it the next morning. You can always see the adjustments that you have made previously, because the sliders are always where you left them. With PS and PSE, you eventually have to save before you shut your computer off......and the next time you start another edit session, you start with the sliders all zeroed out.....why anyone would like that is beyond me. When I see the sliders at their default positions, I expect to see the image the way it looks coming out of the camera. With LR, I do.
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Old 05-19-2015, 10:23 PM   #3
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Don't even use it but............. can't see any difference between 240 vs 300 dpi unless you are to print it, whatever pixels your camera has is what you get.
If you send it somewhere they will adjust PPI and color space etc anyway.
Think 300 is kind of a standard but little overkill for personal printing.


TIFF would have the an advantage of being readily viewable with any(most??)
photo viewers as opposed to a PSD file and also readable by any other editing program. Both are lossless, I believe.

I don't know about the editing in PS losing the sliders. If you are RAW and click done or go into PS any changes in RAw are saved.
Also, since using the cloud version on 8 when I shut down with open PS files they seem to be recovered tho I am not sure what history is saved.

Bob Jordan

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Old 05-20-2015, 02:35 AM   #4
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I'd have figured that if you are going to save a file to later process in a program like Photoshop, or PSE, you'd want to save as a file native to that program. I think PSD's are smaller too. So?

Regarding color profiles - oddly, or maybe because it is the newer format, Procolor is described as the better profile. Better in that more information is saved and available to work with, at least in LR. So why would I work in sRBG? I just now need to remember to convert each file when done.

As for not saving anything until you need it - that means when you need it, you'll have to edit it on demand if you want a copy that has edits only possible in Photoshop (cloning, for instance, or more specific edits). I save all files as 3600 pix X 2400 pix at 300 dpi as I figure that is what publishers prefer and it works well for most prints. From that image, I can get RP resolution images as need and even lower for FB or other sites.

BTW - Do you have backups of your unsaved images? What if something happens to the drive or Lightroom? Is there a way to store those recipes in duplicate? I think I might prefer backups of universally readable files?

/Mitch
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Old 05-20-2015, 02:41 AM   #5
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Lightroom states PSD's are less efficient then Tiffs specifically in regards to saving metadata.

As for sRGB, Lightroom states: The sRGB color space cannot encompass the full range of colors available within Lightroom.

What is backing up the Lightroom catalog? I assume this is not the same as backing up the recipes for all the unsaved processed image files?

/Mitch
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Old 05-20-2015, 04:19 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mgoldman View Post
What is backing up the Lightroom catalog? I assume this is not the same as backing up the recipes for all the unsaved processed image files?

/Mitch
Mitch,

When I initially load images on my hard drive, I back them up to a USB drive.

When I back up the Lightroom Catalog, that saves all of the adjustments I have made to items in the catalog. I back mine up at least once a week, both to my hard drive and to USB back-up drives.
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Old 05-31-2015, 06:41 PM   #7
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Curious - I notice while using Lightroom something a bit odd?

Why are a lot of my thumbs in the library being manipulated by Lightroom?

Most are appearing overexposed - though they are not. Looking over to the right, Lightroom seems to be poorly auto-adjusting the settings, mostly jacking up the exposure and dropping the contrast as well as playing with the shadows and highlights. This is occurring on RAW files and processed images. It's kind of hard to figure out what the image looks like "out of the camera" when LR decides to adjust the sliders on it's own. More odd, after processing a photo in Photoshop, viewing that same image in Lightroom the same is occurring - perfectly edited shots out of whack compliments of Lightroom thumb viewer messing with the sliders?

All fixable by readjusting the sliders, but not by hitting "Reset" on the bottom right.

/Mitch
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