Old 10-24-2014, 11:00 PM   #26
JRMDC
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Mining, there is an intermediate point between field and finished product, no?

I would recommend that anyone who cares about their processing learn to use a histogram, it is an invaluable tool. It goes to the essence of tonality. But I won't be offended by the many who don't take my advice.
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Old 10-27-2014, 02:05 PM   #27
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I see we're comparing apples and oranges. I was talking about the finished product after scanning, resizing etc.
If you have time in the field to check your settings, fine.
Right. I reference the histogram in the field all the time (never in processing), especially when it's bright outside and I can't get a good idea of how the exposure looks on the screen after a test shot (I keep the screen dim, by the way). You know, I want to "get it right" in camera like so many other perfectionists. Yeah, I chimp, and I don't care what others think about that either. It's the end product that matters to me, not the methods involved to achieve it.
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Old 10-27-2014, 02:56 PM   #28
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I use the histogram all the time.....in the field and in processing. As Jim noted, you can't always tell if the exposure is right by using the LCD monitor, but the histogram will definitely help you achieve the most ideal settings for a shot.

In processing, the histogram will also help you adjust to ensure that you don't have too much pure black or pure white. People may look at a photo and say: "This is or that is blown out", but the histogram will tell you for sure. You can also see what is truly recoverable in raw and what is a lost cause.

Although the bell-curve image in Jim's post is the theoretical picture of the "ideal histogram", reality is that the only ideal is the ideal for each unique image. How the histogram will look depends upon the type of elements in the scene, how they are arranged/composed, and the lighting on each. Looking at the camera's histogram for a scene you intend to shoot, and taking some test shots, will help you zero in on the "ideal" for that particular scene. In my mind, this is what separates digital photography from film photography: Instant results and a good, technical means to judge the most appropriate exposure. That means is the histogram.
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Old 10-27-2014, 06:27 PM   #29
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...what separates digital photography from film photography: Instant results and a good, technical means to judge the most appropriate exposure. That means is the histogram.
We slide shooters weren't clueless about getting it right in the camera- it was imperative. We had spot meters, gray cards, "expose for the highlights", etc. And the pros had Polaroids for those test shots.
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Old 10-27-2014, 09:26 PM   #30
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We slide shooters weren't clueless about getting it right in the camera- it was imperative. We had spot meters, gray cards, "expose for the highlights", etc. And the pros had Polaroids for those test shots.
I can relate with the old school mentality. Every time I see someone driving a car with an automatic transmission, I just shake my head. Advances in technology make it too easy for people these days.

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Old 10-27-2014, 10:16 PM   #31
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I can relate with the old school mentality. Every time I see someone driving a car with an automatic transmission, I just shake my head. Advances in technology make it too easy for people these days.

If and when you require medical assistance in the future, make sure you ask for the old school method(s)..

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Old 10-28-2014, 01:09 AM   #32
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And all I did was say "histogram."
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Old 10-28-2014, 01:23 AM   #33
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I use the histogram all the time.....in the field and in processing. ...
.Instant results and a good, technical means to judge the most appropriate exposure. That means is the histogram.
Kevin, this is what I do well. I must admit I mostly go with the meter when the action is hot but when I have a set up, I check the histogram. In processing, it's the first thing I set.

I used light meters for decades; I have four. The last one cost over $700 in 1999 and I tried and tried to learn how to use it skillfully. Never, ever was I totally comfortable with it. Going digital and seeing the instant results finally opened my eyes to what exposure is.

For me, using film plus meter vs. using a digital camera is like the difference between walking in a cave and walking on a sunny beach.
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Old 11-04-2014, 02:19 AM   #34
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Suggestions please......http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...76&key=5155754
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Old 11-04-2014, 03:45 PM   #35
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The photo is overly saturated. The bigger issue would be the very poor image quality throughout the scene. I would pass on this one.

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