Old 02-01-2010, 05:04 PM   #1
JT Burke
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 15
Send a message via Skype™ to JT Burke
Exclamation Need Help!

Ok, so I've tried my photos and they have accoddingly been rejected, so here is what I recently tried. The third I haven't tried yet but do you think it would make the cut?
Thanks!
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2953_1.jpg
Views:	145
Size:	863.8 KB
ID:	5114   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2961_1.jpg
Views:	170
Size:	777.8 KB
ID:	5115   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2897_1.jpg
Views:	138
Size:	629.6 KB
ID:	5116  
JT Burke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2010, 05:15 PM   #2
travsirocz
Senior Member
 
travsirocz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Eau Claire, WI
Posts: 2,459
Send a message via AIM to travsirocz
Default

What do you think and why? What is the main subject? Is the main subject well composed within the frame and why?
travsirocz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2010, 05:25 PM   #3
JRMDC
Senior Member
 
JRMDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 11,202
Default

I will be harsh but precise: you have little sense of composition or light, and your image quality is well below par. You have a lot to learn.

Now, the good news. All of us were at one point or another at your level - I still have the shots to prove it! So in turn you can get to an RP level of photography.

One way to start learning, Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson

http://www.amazon.com/Understanding-.../dp/0817463003

To learn train photo composition specifically, look at RP shots - a LOT - and try to compare them to yours in a critical manner.
__________________
My RP pix are here.
My Flickr pix are here.

My commentaries on rail pictures are in my blog.

RP Photo Albums:
Cabooses
Engine Details
Farm and Train
Plumes!
Railroad Details
Signal Details
Switchstand Shots
JRMDC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2010, 05:47 PM   #4
Chase55671
RailPictures.Net Crew
 
Chase55671's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Nitro, WV
Posts: 2,194
Send a message via AIM to Chase55671 Send a message via MSN to Chase55671
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JT Burke View Post
Ok, so I've tried my photos and they have accoddingly been rejected, so here is what I recently tried. The third I haven't tried yet but do you think it would make the cut?
Thanks!
I think all three of them are garbage. As JRMDC suggested, try taking a look at what gets accepted. You'll quickly find that what you submitted isn't quite what RP is looking for. Light was bad, composition was poor, quality was poor, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JRMDC View Post
I will be harsh but precise: you have little sense of composition or light, and your image quality is well below par. You have a lot to learn.

Now, the good news. All of us were at one point or another at your level - I still have the shots to prove it! So in turn you can get to an RP level of photography.

One way to start learning, Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson

http://www.amazon.com/Understanding-.../dp/0817463003

To learn train photo composition specifically, look at RP shots - a LOT - and try to compare them to yours in a critical manner.
I'm disappointed, J. You forgot to mention my RP.net beginners guide.

Only kidding.
Chase
__________________
Chase Gunnoe
Railpictures.Net Crew
Rail-Videos.Net Crew
Click here to view my photos at Railpictures.Net
SLR Night Photography Tutorial | Railpictures.Net Beginners Guide
Chase55671 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2010, 06:12 PM   #5
Joe the Photog
Senior Member
 
Joe the Photog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Columbia, SC
Posts: 7,895
Default

I'll put on my nice hat today, either though it's faded, worn and torn and doesn't really fit that well. JT, go to the front page of RP and start looking for a photo that you think compares to one of yours. When you find it, link to that shot here and we can discuss.

What will hopefully happen is that you'll realize that are no shots that really compare and then you will take time to learn the craft. We'll answer questions as best we can. But I'd like to hear your answer(s) to what Travis asked about.
__________________
Joe the Photog Dot Com
Joe the Photog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2010, 09:53 PM   #6
JT Burke
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 15
Send a message via Skype™ to JT Burke
Default

First of all thanks for the constructive criticism. I have found that most places I go the elements never turn as perfect as I see here on RP. And the answers...What do you think and why? I have been crazed over CSX's hooded signals and decided that I would go after them. These was the main outcome which, according to circumstaces turned out like this. What is the main subject? The first two was the signal the third was the train. Is the main subject well composed within the frame and why? in the first it was a run and shoot because of the timidity of the cat so that hindered much of the time that it takes to "build" the shot. The second was iffy, it could have had more signal in it. and the third was not as good as I thought because of the limited access to the junction area so I went with a wide view of the area with some sky. I heard that on cloudy days that you keep your back to the sun but that time the sun, location and weather were wrong.

Quote:
"When you find it, link to that shot here and we can discuss".
Ok the closet I could get: cloudy day, no train and grade crossing.
http://www.railpictures.net/viewphot...46000&nseq=215

BTW...in order to get the "good" shots do you need a higher end camera? Ex: Nkn D90

Last edited by JT Burke; 02-03-2010 at 09:51 PM.
JT Burke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2010, 10:03 PM   #7
bigbassloyd
Senior Member
 
bigbassloyd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Hilldale, West Virginia
Posts: 3,723
Default

The best advice I can give from a fellow signal nut, is spend some time photographing signals at dark. I've found it much easier to do creative shots at night, with just the signal as the subject.

Image © Loyd Lowry
PhotoID: 312496
Photograph © Loyd Lowry


Image © Loyd Lowry
PhotoID: 310418
Photograph © Loyd Lowry


Image © Loyd Lowry
PhotoID: 295051
Photograph © Loyd Lowry


Image © Loyd Lowry
PhotoID: 282173
Photograph © Loyd Lowry


Image © Loyd Lowry
PhotoID: 273973
Photograph © Loyd Lowry


Image © Loyd Lowry
PhotoID: 264926
Photograph © Loyd Lowry


Image © Loyd Lowry
PhotoID: 260030
Photograph © Loyd Lowry


Image © Loyd Lowry
PhotoID: 256479
Photograph © Loyd Lowry


Image © Loyd Lowry
PhotoID: 254042
Photograph © Loyd Lowry


Good luck!

Loyd L.
__________________
Social Media elevates the absurd and mediocre to a point where they aren't anymore, and that is a tragedy.

My personal photography site

Last edited by bigbassloyd; 02-01-2010 at 10:04 PM. Reason: world domination
bigbassloyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2010, 12:55 AM   #8
JRMDC
Senior Member
 
JRMDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 11,202
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JT Burke View Post
First of all thanks for the constructive criticism. I have found that most places I go the elements never turn as perfect as I see here on RP. And the answers...What do you think and why?
You need to learn all the basics of photography.

- composition: you need to learn when to be close or zoomed in and when not to be. You need to learn when to put things in the center and when not. When there are multiple elements in a shot you need to learn to arrange them (via positioning and focal length) so the shot makes sense and has interest. These are snapshots. It is not the case that "the elements never turn as perfect as I see here on RP". That is a very passive statement. It is the case that you haven't yet learned how to turn the elements into perfection. It isn't the "place," it is you.

Welcome to the quest, as long as you realize that it will take effort. I think you already realize it will be worthwhile.

- light: you need to learn to recognize good light, what one might do when light is bad, and when sometimes the light is just bad and you aren't going to get a good shot.

- technique/quality: these images are of poor quality, all blurred. You need to figure out whether it is your shooting technique, your post-processing technique, or maybe the quality of your camera.

The first signal, one smallish object in a big frame, with nothing else in the frame of interest. The second signal, a location with a bunch of stuff arranged in a jumble with no clear point of interest, no "story." The train, too far away, terrible light, nothing else interesting within the frame to justify having the train far away and make that interesting.
__________________
My RP pix are here.
My Flickr pix are here.

My commentaries on rail pictures are in my blog.

RP Photo Albums:
Cabooses
Engine Details
Farm and Train
Plumes!
Railroad Details
Signal Details
Switchstand Shots
JRMDC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2010, 04:29 PM   #9
JT Burke
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 15
Send a message via Skype™ to JT Burke
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbassloyd View Post
The best advice I can give from a fellow signal nut, is spend some time photographing signals at dark. I've found it much easier to do creative shots at night, with just the signal as the subject.

Thanks I'll try that soon. However, in order to get the least noise which do you change, the ISO or Aperture? Also my camera can only do time lapses up to 15 seconds is that long enough?
JT Burke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2010, 04:38 PM   #10
travsirocz
Senior Member
 
travsirocz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Eau Claire, WI
Posts: 2,459
Send a message via AIM to travsirocz
Default

15 seconds will work for some. I shoot at night at iso 200 with a aperture of 7.1 and up when possible to help with brighter lights in a dark image.
travsirocz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2010, 05:24 PM   #11
Smoke
Senior Member
 
Smoke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 100
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JT Burke View Post

BTW...in order to get the "good" shots do you need a higher end camera? Ex: Nkn D90
Nope.....
Iphone picture:
Image © John Ryan
PhotoID: 274503
Photograph © John Ryan


Canon A590
Image © Andrew De Kruif
PhotoID: 266888
Photograph © Andrew De Kruif


Canon SD1000
Image © Chris Paulhamus
PhotoID: 270257
Photograph © Chris Paulhamus
__________________
-Andrew
Have Camera, will travel.

Can you find my RP.net photos?
Smoke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2010, 11:37 PM   #12
nikos1
Senior Member
 
nikos1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,775
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by travsirocz View Post
15 seconds will work for some. I shoot at night at iso 200 with a aperture of 7.1 and up when possible to help with brighter lights in a dark image.
No, dont shoot on ISO 200, if you camera can only got to 15 seconds it means its a PNS, stay at ISO 80 or 50.
If you want to shoot a signal at night at 15 seconds, get a train to light up the signal, if you time it right you can get a streak going by but its hard.
15 second exposure
Image © Nikos Kavoori
PhotoID: 305033
Photograph © Nikos Kavoori
__________________


Wedge shots of blue HLCX SD60's http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?userid=7861

More wedge shots of blue HLCX SD60's http://nikos1.rrpicturearchives.net/

Video wedge shots of blue HLCX SD60's
http://youtube.com/profile?user=nikosjk1
nikos1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2010, 05:05 PM   #13
crazytiger
Senior Member
 
crazytiger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: NS Greenville District
Posts: 1,473
Default

time lapse =/= long exposure. A time lapse would be a set of pictures with one taken every five minutes put together to watch a flower bloom or something. Long exposure is what we are talking about here. This is a cool time lapse shot from wikipedia.
__________________
Peter Lewis | Portfolio | Profile | Flickr | Facebook

Canon EOS 40D
Canon EF 50 f/1.8 II
Canon EF 70-200mm f/4 L USM
Canon EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM


Quote:
Originally Posted by A Friend
everytime i see non-train photos of yours i think, "so much talent. wasted on trains."
crazytiger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2010, 05:15 PM   #14
Chase55671
RailPictures.Net Crew
 
Chase55671's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Nitro, WV
Posts: 2,194
Send a message via AIM to Chase55671 Send a message via MSN to Chase55671
Default

15 seconds won't get you too far for night stuff, especially for signals. The ISO will have to stay low, as P&S cameras are known to have a considerable amount of noise when exceeding ISO 100 and the exposures are of course, limited.

SLR's can be at times, rather expensive, but I'd recommend looking into one if you're wishing to take photography serious. The Canon XS would be a good start.

Chase
(Patiently awaiting Nikos' reply)
__________________
Chase Gunnoe
Railpictures.Net Crew
Rail-Videos.Net Crew
Click here to view my photos at Railpictures.Net
SLR Night Photography Tutorial | Railpictures.Net Beginners Guide
Chase55671 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2010, 08:15 PM   #15
bigbassloyd
Senior Member
 
bigbassloyd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Hilldale, West Virginia
Posts: 3,723
Default

Just for reference, I use the XS with 3 cheap lenses (18-55mm kit, 55-250mm IS, 50mm f1.

Loyd L.
__________________
Social Media elevates the absurd and mediocre to a point where they aren't anymore, and that is a tragedy.

My personal photography site
bigbassloyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2010, 08:57 PM   #16
JT Burke
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 15
Send a message via Skype™ to JT Burke
Default

Thanks guys, ya'll are a great help. I currently have a Canon A590, and it seems to be a crossover type camera. I have tried a bit with exposures Ex:2.

On the part of the Sub I'm on, the lighting is quite odd and in most cases I am limited at the location that I shoot at. I think the subject is two fold with the two trains but I don't know how to improve it Ex:1.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2348_2_1.jpg
Views:	104
Size:	233.0 KB
ID:	5139   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2296_1.JPG
Views:	106
Size:	642.1 KB
ID:	5140  
JT Burke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2010, 09:09 PM   #17
Chase55671
RailPictures.Net Crew
 
Chase55671's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Nitro, WV
Posts: 2,194
Send a message via AIM to Chase55671 Send a message via MSN to Chase55671
Default

That first one seems to be lacking good quality. Not sure what's up with it, but I believe regardless if you abuse it in post processing, it'll still be a photo to keep for the personal archives.

The second one is a bit too bland and the oncoming headlight is distracting.

For an idea of what Railpictures is looking for, I recommend checking out my Railpictures.net Beginners Guide and my Night Photography guide. They may be helpful. Both guides can be found in my signature.

Chase
__________________
Chase Gunnoe
Railpictures.Net Crew
Rail-Videos.Net Crew
Click here to view my photos at Railpictures.Net
SLR Night Photography Tutorial | Railpictures.Net Beginners Guide
Chase55671 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2010, 09:43 PM   #18
JT Burke
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 15
Send a message via Skype™ to JT Burke
Default

Thanks, I read your Guide and the pictures that come out as poor quality are the max that I can get them to, in order to pass for demensions, 1024 x 800. I set that in my software but it is still too large.
JT Burke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2010, 10:13 PM   #19
bigbassloyd
Senior Member
 
bigbassloyd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Hilldale, West Virginia
Posts: 3,723
Default

Take photos in the largest, highest quality setting your camera will do, and use post processing to resize them.

Loyd L.
__________________
Social Media elevates the absurd and mediocre to a point where they aren't anymore, and that is a tragedy.

My personal photography site
bigbassloyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2010, 01:19 PM   #20
dejv
Senior Member
 
dejv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Central Europe
Posts: 160
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JT Burke View Post
Thanks guys, ya'll are a great help. I currently have a Canon A590, ...
You're doing something wrong. I took this photo with A720 (pretty much the same camera) and the only editing was a resize and a bit of sharpening:
Image © David Jaša
PhotoID: 244384
Photograph © David Jaša


It may be dirty lens or some crappy setting. What mode & settings do you use to take your pics and how do you edit them in your PC?
__________________
-- David Jaša

Click Here to view my photos at RailPictures.Net!
dejv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2010, 10:28 PM   #21
JT Burke
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 15
Send a message via Skype™ to JT Burke
Default

I usually use the Program, Manual and Auto settings at 8meg. I use their provided Canon software (ZoomBrowser EX) and found that the export settings are not the same as when you set them. So I set my dementions to 1005 X 800 and then it will go through with uploading.
JT Burke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2010, 11:45 PM   #22
crazytiger
Senior Member
 
crazytiger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: NS Greenville District
Posts: 1,473
Default

It is better to start with a higher setting than that such that you have more versatility with cropping and such. It is worth having to compress it later.
__________________
Peter Lewis | Portfolio | Profile | Flickr | Facebook

Canon EOS 40D
Canon EF 50 f/1.8 II
Canon EF 70-200mm f/4 L USM
Canon EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM


Quote:
Originally Posted by A Friend
everytime i see non-train photos of yours i think, "so much talent. wasted on trains."
crazytiger is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 10:04 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.