Old 11-01-2010, 05:16 PM   #1
coborn35
Senior Member
 
coborn35's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 1,398
Default Something doesn't look right...

Image © Kelly Lynch
PhotoID: 343574
Photograph © Kelly Lynch


Does this look like a drag queen to anyone else? It looks like a man to me, or a very ugly woman. I kinda feel bad for asking, and I don't care if it is, but it just didn't quite strike me as a woman right away.
__________________
I personally have had a problem with those trying to tell us to turn railroad photography into an "art form." It's fine for them to do so, I welcome it in fact, but what I do have a problem with is that the practitioners of the more "arty" shots, I have found, tend to look down their nose's at others who are shooting more "mundane" shots.
Railroad photography is what you make of it, but one way is not "better" than another, IMHO. Unless you have a pole right thought the nose of the engine! -SG

Last edited by coborn35; 11-01-2010 at 07:48 PM.
coborn35 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2010, 05:23 PM   #2
troy12n
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 5,333
Default

The term is "bull" or "butch" I think

Completely unrealistic shot. Pretty girl with lipstick working on a steam engine? Please... I commented as such, but the comment I am sure will not get accepted. They accept anti-muslim comments but not true criticism. Credit to the photographer for knowing what the formula to success on rp.net is though...
troy12n is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2010, 05:32 PM   #3
coborn35
Senior Member
 
coborn35's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 1,398
Default

Its really just a discredit to woman who actually work on the railroad, such as this woman:
Image © W. D. Shaw
PhotoID: 342311
Photograph © W. D. Shaw
__________________
I personally have had a problem with those trying to tell us to turn railroad photography into an "art form." It's fine for them to do so, I welcome it in fact, but what I do have a problem with is that the practitioners of the more "arty" shots, I have found, tend to look down their nose's at others who are shooting more "mundane" shots.
Railroad photography is what you make of it, but one way is not "better" than another, IMHO. Unless you have a pole right thought the nose of the engine! -SG
coborn35 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2010, 06:49 PM   #4
Greg P
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Baltimore MD
Posts: 1,003
Send a message via AIM to Greg P
Default

I would love to find the picture of Amtrak girl.

It's a girl smoking a cig on an AMTK switcher in Ivy City.
Greg P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2010, 06:59 PM   #5
ExNavyDoc
Senior Member
 
ExNavyDoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 123
Default

Strikes me as a "gimmick shot".

Looks soft on my monitor, the light is harsh, and the locomotive looks like it's about to roll right off the rails sideways.

From what I've seen from real photos from the '40's, women back then had a "softer" look. The gal in this photo, while not unattractive, has a more "modern" angular appearance. Also, the expression on her face says "I'm going to find my ex-husband, and bash him in the nuts with this big-ass wrench-thingy".

I'm not a fan. On the other hand, I did click on it...
__________________
______________

Mike

My RP.net Photos Here

My Smugmug Galleries Here
ExNavyDoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2010, 07:02 PM   #6
trainboysd40
Senior Member
 
trainboysd40's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Calgary, Alberta on the CP Laggan Subdivision
Posts: 2,048
Send a message via MSN to trainboysd40
Default

Thank you railpictures.net screeners for being a bunch of horny loners
If I had taken it, I would have deleted it the moment I reviewed it.
__________________
got a D5 IIi and now he doesnt afread fo 12800 iSO
Youtube (Model Railway, Vlogs, Tutorials, and prototype)
My Website
Obligatory link to shots on RP, HERE
trainboysd40 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2010, 07:08 PM   #7
KevinM
Senior Member
 
KevinM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 2,010
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by coborn35 View Post
Its really just a discredit to woman who actually work on the railroad, such as this woman:
Image © W. D. Shaw
PhotoID: 342311
Photograph © W. D. Shaw
I'm having difficulting understanding your perspective here. I believe Kelly's photo was meant as an artful depiction of a historically accurate scene. During World War II, so many of our nation's young men were deployed to the European and Asian theaters that many industries....the railroads included....had to turn to the female population to provide the labor to sustain the war effort. Women very successfully filled many traditionally male roles during that difficult time....from ferrying military fighter planes to maintaining steam locomotives. Women who did hard, physically demanding jobs were sometimes collectively referred to as "Rosie the Riveter"....or just "Rosies". They were often depicted in painted, war-effort posters, which served to boost morale at home. The look and composition of such posters was not unlike Kelly's photo at all and may have provided the inspiration for this shot.

At the end of the war of course, things reverted to the way they had been. Most of the ladies were discharged from those jobs and the returning soldiers re-assumed those duties. It would take decades more before women would finally gain equal opportunity in the workplace.

Nice shot, Kelly. Wish it were mine!
__________________
/Kevin

My RP stuff is here.

Link to my Flickr Albums. Lots of Steam Railroad stuff there from all over the US.
KevinM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2010, 08:01 PM   #8
troy12n
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 5,333
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinM View Post
Women very successfully filled many traditionally male roles during that difficult time....from ferrying military fighter planes to maintaining steam locomotives. Women who did hard, physically demanding jobs were sometimes collectively referred to as "Rosie the Riveter"....or just "Rosies".
You can bet your ass they didnt look like that. Those war propaganda posters you may have seen were not very representative of what the industrial working woman looked like. I have seen a lot of history channel documentaries and they cover the situation much more realistically. Also, since the railroads were deemed essential to the war effort, they were able to maintain their male workforce for the most part. I seriously doubt you saw very many female workers in the locomotive service vocation. Even during the war.
troy12n is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2010, 09:20 PM   #9
IHapsias
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by coborn35 View Post
Image © Kelly Lynch
PhotoID: 343574
Photograph © Kelly Lynch


Does this look like a drag queen to anyone else? It looks like a man to me, or a very ugly woman. I kinda feel bad for asking, and I don't care if it is, but it just didn't quite strike me as a woman right away.
I think its photoshopped. How are her clothes all dirty, yet shes wearing pearls, lipstick and her hair and face are clean without a single grudge of oil or something. If not the case, then what the hell?
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2010, 09:30 PM   #10
EMTRailfan
Senior Member
 
EMTRailfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: I can be found railfanning the abandoned B&O Northern Sub.
Posts: 1,454
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by IHapsias View Post
I think its photoshopped. How are her clothes all dirty, yet shes wearing pearls, lipstick and her hair and face are clean without a single grudge of oil or something. If not the case, then what the hell?
Staged...yes, but photoshopped???!!!
__________________
A Picture Is Worth 1000 Words. A Memory Is Worth 1000 Pictures.
EMTRailfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2010, 09:33 PM   #11
Joe the Photog
Senior Member
 
Joe the Photog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Columbia, SC
Posts: 7,899
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by EMTRailfan View Post
Staged...yes, but photoshopped???!!!
You and I had pretty much the same reaction. Why is it so hard to figure out that the photog had the model put on clothes that had been oiled and greased? It's a good shot.
__________________
Joe the Photog Dot Com
Joe the Photog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2010, 09:35 PM   #12
IHapsias
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by EMTRailfan View Post
Staged...yes, but photoshopped???!!!
Layering; who says you can't go in and layer a women into this photo?

Probably not, but who knows, unless the photographer comes on thread and tells us firsthand.

If you dis-agree, fair said, as were all entitled to our personal opinions and thoughts.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2010, 09:51 PM   #13
EMTRailfan
Senior Member
 
EMTRailfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: I can be found railfanning the abandoned B&O Northern Sub.
Posts: 1,454
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by IHapsias View Post
Layering; who says you can't go in and layer a women into this photo?

Probably not, but who knows, unless the photographer comes on thread and tells us firsthand.

If you dis-agree, fair said, as were all entitled to our personal opinions and thoughts.
You are right about your opinion, as we all have one, but you should think about the obvious possibilities before you go accusing a well respected photographer (or anyone else) of manipulation.

So Darryl photoshopped the smoke and guy into this photo or was it staged?
Image © Darryl Rule
PhotoID: 323457
Photograph © Darryl Rule
__________________
A Picture Is Worth 1000 Words. A Memory Is Worth 1000 Pictures.
EMTRailfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2010, 09:52 PM   #14
KevinM
Senior Member
 
KevinM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 2,010
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by troy12n View Post
Also, since the railroads were deemed essential to the war effort, they were able to maintain their male workforce for the most part. I seriously doubt you saw very many female workers in the locomotive service vocation. Even during the war.
A lot of things were deemed essential to the war effort. That didn't absolve men who built tanks and airplanes from their duty to serve on the front lines. Rather than dismiss the idea that women did some of railroading's dirtier jobs, you might want to consider reading some books on the subject, or visiting a museum....or perhaps actually talking to someone from that generation. Do it quickly, however. They are leaving our midst in great numbers these days.

Earlier this year, I had an opportunity to tour one of the country's best steam locomotive shops under the guidance of the President and CMO of the railroad....one of the nation's most respected authorities on steam. During his presentation, he lamented that the current generations of young people no longer seem to have much interest in or appreciation for history. I found that observation rather sad.
__________________
/Kevin

My RP stuff is here.

Link to my Flickr Albums. Lots of Steam Railroad stuff there from all over the US.
KevinM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2010, 10:04 PM   #15
bigbassloyd
Senior Member
 
bigbassloyd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Hilldale, West Virginia
Posts: 3,740
Default

The steam engine is unlevel, and should have been rejected for such..

Loyd L.
__________________
Social Media elevates the absurd and mediocre to a point where they aren't anymore, and that is a tragedy.

My personal photography site
bigbassloyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2010, 10:10 PM   #16
IHapsias
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by EMTRailfan View Post
You are right about your opinion, as we all have one, but you should think about the obvious possibilities before you go accusing a well respected photographer (or anyone else) of manipulation.

So Darryl photoshopped the smoke and guy into this photo or was it staged?
Image © Darryl Rule
PhotoID: 323457
Photograph © Darryl Rule
I am not trying to accuse him; I stated my opinion is all. Yes my opinion does say that I think its photoshopped, but I did not say the photographer was a fake. The Darryl photo was staged, and we know it. The point to make with the photo of discussion is that we don't know if it was actually staged or not.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2010, 11:16 PM   #17
Slickrick339889
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 96
Default

I just hope all those people expecting to see a beautiful woman enjoyed the man they saw when it was full screen. Kinda looks like me if I put on a wig, earrings, and lipstick.
Slickrick339889 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2010, 11:23 PM   #18
coborn35
Senior Member
 
coborn35's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 1,398
Default

Thank you!
__________________
I personally have had a problem with those trying to tell us to turn railroad photography into an "art form." It's fine for them to do so, I welcome it in fact, but what I do have a problem with is that the practitioners of the more "arty" shots, I have found, tend to look down their nose's at others who are shooting more "mundane" shots.
Railroad photography is what you make of it, but one way is not "better" than another, IMHO. Unless you have a pole right thought the nose of the engine! -SG
coborn35 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2010, 11:24 PM   #19
Chase55671
RailPictures.Net Crew
 
Chase55671's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Nitro, WV
Posts: 2,194
Send a message via AIM to Chase55671 Send a message via MSN to Chase55671
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by IHapsias View Post
I think its photoshopped. How are her clothes all dirty, yet shes wearing pearls, lipstick and her hair and face are clean without a single grudge of oil or something. If not the case, then what the hell?


Quote:
Originally Posted by IHapsias View Post
Layering; who says you can't go in and layer a women into this photo?

Probably not, but who knows, unless the photographer comes on thread and tells us firsthand.

If you dis-agree, fair said, as were all entitled to our personal opinions and thoughts.

Layered? What makes you think the scene is layered? Your statements make no sense. Her shadow is legit. The lighting on both her and the steam engine are the same. This one isn't even questionable.. Definitely legit, but also definitely staged..

Chase
__________________
Chase Gunnoe
Railpictures.Net Crew
Rail-Videos.Net Crew
Click here to view my photos at Railpictures.Net
SLR Night Photography Tutorial | Railpictures.Net Beginners Guide
Chase55671 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2010, 01:18 AM   #20
Joey Bowman
Senior Member
 
Joey Bowman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Hudson, NC
Posts: 358
Default

if it was in focus it would be a good shot.
Joey Bowman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2010, 01:38 AM   #21
mersenne6
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 69
Default

...The distribution of looks as far as the women doing war time work on the railroads was about the same as you would expect in the rest of the population at large - some attractive, some not, and most just typical people. I can't find the photograph I wanted to scan in and post in answer to the comment about what they looked like but as for doing hard work - you might want to consider this - I interviewed this woman about 15 years ago - she worked for the UP during World War II.

"Louise M-, started working as an engine wiper shortly after the start of World War II. According to Louise, there were four women assigned to each engine (2 per side) and their instructions were to "wipe as high as you can reach and as low as you can go". For Louise the working hours were 12 midnight to 8 am. These hours were in conflict with those of her husband's (a railroad mechanic) and this did cause a few problems.

"There were times when the was work was so fast paced that you lost all track of time". On one occasion she worked right through the quitting whistle and her absence wasn't noticed until her husband, who was waiting for her at the gate, queried one of her co-workers. The two went looking for her, first in the wash room and then out in the yard. They found her still washing engines.

Eventually Louise was transferred to sweeping track both at the Coach Yard and at the Rip Track. Her boss for the track sweeping detail always tried to ensure that she had what she
needed. Her one big concern was for good working gloves so that she wouldn't have to reach into waste barrels with her bare hands. "
mersenne6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2010, 02:46 AM   #22
barnstormer
Senior Member
 
barnstormer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 374
Send a message via Skype™ to barnstormer
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by coborn35 View Post
Image © Kelly Lynch
PhotoID: 343574
Photograph © Kelly Lynch


Does this look like a drag queen to anyone else? It looks like a man to me, or a very ugly woman. I kinda feel bad for asking, and I don't care if it is, but it just didn't quite strike me as a woman right away.
I totally agree with you. I don't mind a shot like this if it is more realistic but this doesn't even look like a girl. Crap.
__________________
Stay out of the train's way and they will stay out of your way.

See my shots on Railpictures
See my shots on RRpicturearchives
barnstormer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2010, 02:55 AM   #23
troy12n
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 5,333
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mersenne6 View Post
I interviewed this woman about 15 years ago - she worked for the UP during World War II.

"Louise M-, started working as an engine wiper shortly after the start of World War II. According to Louise, there were four women assigned to each engine (2 per side) and their instructions were to "wipe as high as you can reach and as low as you can go". For Louise the working hours were 12 midnight to 8 am. These hours were in conflict with those of her husband's (a railroad mechanic) and this did cause a few problems...They found her still washing engines.

Eventually Louise was transferred to sweeping track both at the Coach Yard and at the Rip Track. Her boss for the track sweeping detail always tried to ensure that she had what she
needed.
I never said they didnt work for the railroad, I was saying it was unrealistic because the picture shows here carrying a huge pipe wrench, indicating she is some sort of pipefitter, boiler worker, mechanic, etc.

You indicate several jobs women most likely did before and after the war: wiping (cleaning) engines, sweeping track, etc.

I would put money on the fact that they didnt mechanically touch a locomotive or railcar.
troy12n is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2010, 03:14 AM   #24
JRMDC
Senior Member
 
JRMDC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 11,202
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by troy12n View Post
I would put money on the fact that they didnt mechanically touch a locomotive or railcar.
Well, I will save you, perhaps you won't enter into a foolish bet with someone now.

This shot is not rail, it is aircraft, but it is 1943, it is a woman, and it is a mechanical device (a drill).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ro...ltee%29_DS.jpg

And it only took me a few seconds to find evidence that your view is foolish. Not an engine or railcar? True. But think, open your mind, do you REALLY think, now, that no woman "touch"ed a locomotive or railcar?
__________________
My RP pix are here.
My Flickr pix are here.

My commentaries on rail pictures are in my blog.

RP Photo Albums:
Cabooses
Engine Details
Farm and Train
Plumes!
Railroad Details
Signal Details
Switchstand Shots
JRMDC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2010, 03:28 AM   #25
troy12n
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 5,333
Default

They may well have worked in a factory building them, but I stand by my belief that they were not out there maintaining or servicing them. I could be wrong (wouldnt be the first time), but I doubt it.
troy12n is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 06:07 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.