Old 01-19-2012, 12:57 AM   #1
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Hi guys!

I'm a bit puzzled by this rejection :

http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...=1006103&key=0

I leveled off the buidling on the left, which is pretty much the only reliable vertical I have to work with. Signal on the right looks good too... what am I missing?

Thanks!
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Old 01-19-2012, 01:02 AM   #2
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About .5-.8 CW rotation should do it.
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Old 01-19-2012, 01:19 AM   #3
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The building and signals are a small portion of a much larger scene. Whether it is or isn't, the photo has a leaning appearance to it.
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Old 01-19-2012, 02:33 AM   #4
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Got it. I agree it appears to be leaning, but the train being on a curve is probably what's tricking you and me (and the screener?) into thinking that it's unlevel... verticals don't lie!

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Thanks guys!
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Old 01-19-2012, 04:22 AM   #5
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It is level. Would be interesting to see what happens to the building and the signals if you corrected it. Then it would really be unlevel. I carry a small level with me as I've mentioned in another thread. Doesn't improve the quality of my shots but they're always level and takes less time than finding something in the view finder to level off of.
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Old 01-19-2012, 05:31 AM   #6
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I forgot that you probably weren't using a tripod. The new technique is to level in post edit. I use a tripod all the time so the hand held level works well for me. Old habits die hard. If you weren't using a level you sure did a great job. Keep on keepn' on.
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Old 01-19-2012, 07:45 PM   #7
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I forgot that you probably weren't using a tripod. The new technique is to level in post edit. I use a tripod all the time so the hand held level works well for me. Old habits die hard. If you weren't using a level you sure did a great job. Keep on keepn' on.
Probably because it takes a lot less time to snap a picture hand held and then level in post than it does to set up a tripod, mount the camera, rotate the head into position and do the fine adjustments it takes to line up the bubble. And also because a tripod is too cumbersome and impractical for a lot of photographers shooting during the day.

Then again, there are those guys who do it handheld and are perfect at holding a camera level. I'm not one of them. Heck, I can't even get it perfectly level using a tripod with the leveling feature on the 60D, so post leveling will always be necessary for me.
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Old 01-19-2012, 07:49 PM   #8
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Those F40's look really stupid with the modified headlights.
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Old 01-19-2012, 08:34 PM   #9
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I rarely use a tripod during the day, mostly because I'm lazy, or because it isn't a practical solution when chasing a train (as Jim said). When I do use one, it's usually because I have a very precise composition in mind and I know I have time to setup.

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Those F40's look really stupid with the modified headlights.
I get that a lot from local railfans... I'm not sure how to feel about it. It's just an extra light, now, isn't it?
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Old 01-19-2012, 09:10 PM   #10
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I get that a lot from local railfans... I'm not sure how to feel about it. It's just an extra light, now, isn't it?
They could do it a little less half-ass.

American F40's had a light inbetween the number boards. I think on delivery it was red, but some ended up with a clear lamp. They could have put an entire nother set of lamps between the numberboards if they wanted more light.
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Old 01-19-2012, 09:21 PM   #11
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They could do it a little less half-ass.

American F40's had a light inbetween the number boards. I think on delivery it was red, but some ended up with a clear lamp. They could have put an entire nother set of lamps between the numberboards if they wanted more light.
It's a very bad idea to install headlights above the windshield when the locomotives are going to be used in snowy environnements.

If it snows at night, any light mounted above the windshield completely blinds the crews. That's why nose-mounted headlights is so typical of Canadian locomotives.
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Old 01-20-2012, 05:05 AM   #12
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They could do it a little less half-ass.

American F40's had a light inbetween the number boards. I think on delivery it was red, but some ended up with a clear lamp. They could have put an entire nother set of lamps between the numberboards if they wanted more light.
They could have put another set of headlights between the numberboards but they wouldn't give out near the light that "extra" HID lamp does, and would've looked dumber in the process. Then there's the main reason, which Mathieu already mentioned. It's like when you put fog lights on your car, you mount them low so the bounce-back doesn't blind you. VIA started putting them things on back around '06. You wanna see really stupid, look at them on the P42s. Oh, I forgot! in that case it's not the light that looks stupid!
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Old 01-20-2012, 04:23 PM   #13
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Those F40's look really stupid with the modified headlights.
Compared to most of our "American" F40's, I'd take the extra light any day. Its better than one being cut up or turned into cabbage.

What is the hump at the rear for?
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Old 01-20-2012, 04:25 PM   #14
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It's a very bad idea to install headlights above the windshield when the locomotives are going to be used in snowy environnements.

If it snows at night, any light mounted above the windshield completely blinds the crews. That's why nose-mounted headlights is so typical of Canadian locomotives.
From an operational stand point of view, I do prefer nose mounted headlights over cab mounted headlights.

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Compared to most of our "American" F40's, I'd take the extra light any day. Its better than one being cut up or turned into cabbage.

What is the hump at the rear for?
Head End Power, when CAD Rail in Montreal rebuilt VIA's aging F40PH-2D's they received a separate HEP generator that runs at full power. Which means the prime mover can be idled now without providing head end power to the coaches.
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Old 01-20-2012, 05:27 PM   #15
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Probably because it takes a lot less time to snap a picture hand held and then level in post than it does to set up a tripod, mount the camera, rotate the head into position and do the fine adjustments it takes to line up the bubble. And also because a tripod is too cumbersome and impractical for a lot of photographers shooting during the day.

Then again, there are those guys who do it handheld and are perfect at holding a camera level. I'm not one of them. Heck, I can't even get it perfectly level using a tripod with the leveling feature on the 60D, so post leveling will always be necessary for me.
Just as a point of possible interest. Up to at least the mid-nineties a railfan/photographer, at least the ones that I knew, whether alone or in a group carried a tripod & level, a scanner, a clipboard w/ form attached for recording Frame # - Date - Time - Station - Sub - Milepost - Direction - Train # - Unit #(s) - Remotes - mm - F# - Speed and film type. Oh yeah, almost forgot the voice recorder for recording info they didn't have time to write down. It got pretty hectic on group outings. Changing lenses, chasing trains. Then, when the slides came back, all of the recorded info had to be hand written on the cardboard frames. It was all quite the obsession and the main reason I lost interest. Of course the older guys would pick a good location and work it from several different angles, never in any great rush. Then they'd change locations and do it again. Much more relaxing and enjoyable.

So, thank goodness for the new technology. It's much better and almost effortless today.
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Old 01-20-2012, 07:03 PM   #16
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Just as a point of possible interest. Up to at least the mid-nineties a railfan/photographer, at least the ones that I knew, whether alone or in a group carried a tripod & level, a scanner, a clipboard w/ form attached for recording Frame # - Date - Time - Station - Sub - Milepost - Direction - Train # - Unit #(s) - Remotes - mm - F# - Speed and film type. Oh yeah, almost forgot the voice recorder for recording info they didn't have time to write down. It got pretty hectic on group outings. Changing lenses, chasing trains. Then, when the slides came back, all of the recorded info had to be hand written on the cardboard frames. It was all quite the obsession and the main reason I lost interest. Of course the older guys would pick a good location and work it from several different angles, never in any great rush. Then they'd change locations and do it again. Much more relaxing and enjoyable.

So, thank goodness for the new technology. It's much better and almost effortless today.
All that being said, I still wouldn't have used a tripod back in the day for average daytime shooting.

And don't worry, I've had obsessions with other things in life that would parallel the obsessions you wrote about above. Just because I don't apply that to photography today, it doesn't mean I wouldn't have back then when it was necessary.
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Old 01-20-2012, 07:14 PM   #17
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Yeah, but post processing sure was easier. Send roll of Kodachrome to Kodak, open box when it comes back. Done.
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Old 01-20-2012, 07:54 PM   #18
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Yeah, but post processing sure was easier. Send roll of Kodachrome to Kodak, open box when it comes back. Done.
shoot some velvia. what joy not to have to mess with photoshop.
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Old 01-20-2012, 08:13 PM   #19
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shoot some velvia. what joy not to have to mess with photoshop.
I haven't taken any slides since Kodachrome went away. I loved that stuff.
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Old 01-20-2012, 08:30 PM   #20
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All that being said, I still wouldn't have used a tripod back in the day for average daytime shooting.

And don't worry, I've had obsessions with other things in life that would parallel the obsessions you wrote about above. Just because I don't apply that to photography today, it doesn't mean I wouldn't have back then when it was necessary.
I know you would have applied whatever was necessary, and I bet you would have used a tripod as well because you really do care about level. A tripod was the only way to get level. I meant nothing derogatory towards you and I enjoy your work.

The obsession I was talking about were the sometimes annoying individuals who took it way too seriously. The milepost had to accurate within 3 inches and so on. Had to get away from that, moved on and now shoot alone when I have time. Regards
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Old 01-20-2012, 09:47 PM   #21
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Just as a point of possible interest. Up to at least the mid-nineties a railfan/photographer, at least the ones that I knew, whether alone or in a group carried a tripod & level, a scanner, a clipboard w/ form attached for recording Frame # - Date - Time - Station - Sub - Milepost - Direction - Train # - Unit #(s) - Remotes - mm - F# - Speed and film type. Oh yeah, almost forgot the voice recorder for recording info they didn't have time to write down. It got pretty hectic on group outings. Changing lenses, chasing trains. Then, when the slides came back, all of the recorded info had to be hand written on the cardboard frames. It was all quite the obsession and the main reason I lost interest. Of course the older guys would pick a good location and work it from several different angles, never in any great rush. Then they'd change locations and do it again. Much more relaxing and enjoyable.

So, thank goodness for the new technology. It's much better and almost effortless today.
I wrote a little piece in the old CTC Board Magazine several years ago about this degree of anal retentive photography. I like to know the date, where I am when the shot is taken, and maybe the train number. I kind of lost interest in the train number stuff when they stopped being "number 90," and instead became "PHUZZBLAT99X-007." Who could possibly care?

To my way of thinking, the ONLY thing that matters is "get the shot!" What purpose does it serve if you have some massive data base on your train photography---but your photography sucks!?

For me, it's a matter of priorities. The one and only priority is bring home a memorable photo. All the rest really doesn't matter...
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