Old 07-18-2007, 05:00 PM   #1
Tennispro4ever
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Default Rejections, Rejections And More Rejections

Hey all you railroad fans. I am totally new at this. I have uploaded and submitted four different railroad shots, and they have all been rejected. I wasn't sure if any of you guys could give me some help as to how to fix them, or maybe try different angles or composition of shots.
http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...key=1216090976
http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...d=395168&key=0
http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...&key=814832679
http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...key=1200041080

Personally I thought some of these were pretty good, but again, I am new at this. I have also attatched some photos of which i have not yet submitted, but was wondering if you guys could give me feed back before i try to add them. Thanks
Attached Images
File Type: jpg P7180002.jpg (124.8 KB, 134 views)
File Type: jpg P7180011.jpg (124.1 KB, 111 views)
File Type: jpg P7180021.jpg (184.0 KB, 104 views)
File Type: jpg P7180025.jpg (171.4 KB, 98 views)
File Type: jpg P7180026.jpg (141.7 KB, 97 views)
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Old 07-18-2007, 05:22 PM   #2
JRMDC
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So much to say, so little time...

Quality of Light: very important for a nice picture. Your pictures here are too dark (cloud blocked the sun?), sun from wrong direction (no sun on nose). For starters, as a beginner, go with the "sun coming over your shoulder from behind your back" position and master that first. The standard here for good light, especially for otherwise standard trackside wedge compositions, is pretty high. Don't be surprised, or frustrated or disappointed, if you go out shooting for a day and end up with no shots worthy of the database here. And that includes when you shoot around mid-day during the summer, even if the day is beautiful; the light is coming straight down from overhead aand is not flattering, such as #2 in particular.

Composition: especially as a beginner, fill the frame! A picture of a fairly boring scene with a small train in the middle is a no-no (#1, #3). Crop the excess off the four sides (not those two particular ones, they won't get in regardless). #2 is better, but the dark tree on the left isn't interesting (in part because poorly lit, backlit) and the train is cut off - in many instances, a wedge shot works much better if one can see the entirety of the train tailing off to the background.

Oh, what's a wedge/wedgie? See this thread here in the forums: http://www.railpictures.net/forums/s...ead.php?t=5507

#4 comment: you went for either a sunset or a silhouette shot. Everything in the scene is dark, but not so dark that it is a silhouette. And for a sunset, there are no interesting sky effects such as colorful sunset clouds. And the train is heading away from the camera, which is usually a problem for RP in an otherwise standard composition.

No time to talk about the other 5, two of which, by the way, are in the submitted four or so similar I can't tell them apart.

Good luck! There is a significant learning curve to get shots accepted here. I am sorry to report that you have quite a long way to go, but we all have done it and it is
worthwhile.
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Old 07-18-2007, 05:24 PM   #3
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Some tips:
- get a good photography book and read it. Get a sense of composition and of light. Just the basics - I'm not saying become an "artiste" - just understand the essential elements. Light. Composition. Rule of Thirds. That sort of thing.
- spend some time looking, critically, at the shots on RP. See how they are lit and see how the compositions are.
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Old 07-18-2007, 05:55 PM   #4
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JRMDC is right. All you need is practice and you will begin to produce better photo's over time. Just keep at it.
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Old 07-18-2007, 06:02 PM   #5
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Hi,

Don't feel alone, we've all been new to RP at some point. While I started contributing with the guidance of my dad who was already a contributor, I can bet I understand what it's like finding this site yourself and trying it out.

--------------

Since we all have different opinions, here's mine on your shots:

Reject 1:
- The shot was taken too early. The train should nearly fill the frame, not just be something in it.
- The lighting is poor. It appears as though the sun was behind clouds.
- The camera has focused in on something other than the train.
- The shot is looking too far to the right. If you take it looking more to the left in this spot, there will be less dead, distracting space.
- BTW, that locomotive is noteworthy as it is some of the newest power on BNSF. That is an EMD SD70ACe.

Reject 2:
- The train should be further into the frame. The tree is uninteresting and casts distracting shadows.
- The shot is taken facing more into the sun then away from it (backlit). This causes a dark look to the subject.

Reject 3:
- The shot is facing nearly directly into the sun, resulting in poor light on the train.
- While not mentioned in the rejection reasons, the train fills up very little of the frame. Had you let it get a little closer, it will fill more of the frame and you can crop out more space on the left side. However, don't let obstructing objects get in between the subject and the camera, such as that post in this shot.

Reject 4:
- The exposure is so dark from the backlighting that you can't really see what is going on. While this works for a complete sillouhette (excuse my spelling ) shot, it did not work here since the sun is still above the train.
- The shot isn't focused enough on the locomotive, but rather the cars in the background.

Attachment 1:
- The subject is cut off. Back away from the caboose and get the whole shabang in the shot, not just part of it.
- There is too much dead space on the left side.
- The lighting is poor (backlit).

Attachment 2:
- It's a going away shot. Going away shots of standard power/trains aren't accepted.
- There is too much space on the left side.
- The lighting is poor (clouds).

Attachment 3:
- Similar to Reject 2.

Attachment 4:
- The lighting is poor (clouds).
- The photo's composition is off-balance. The train should be closer to the caboose.
- The train is cut-off in a wedge-style shot.

Attachment 5:
- Similar to Reject 3.

--------------

I have to agree with JRMDC here, completely:

Quote:
- spend some time looking, critically, at the shots on RP. See how they are lit and see how the compositions are.
The more time you look through RP photos, the better you will understand the composition and lighting of them. Also, don't always rely on the appearance of photos uploaded (not necessarily taken) a few years back. RP hasn't always been as strict about composition as they are today.

~Carl Becker
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Old 07-18-2007, 08:09 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRMDC
Some tips:
- get a good photography book and read it.
I'd like to suggest "Understanding Exposure" by Brian Peterson. It's one of THE best photography books for beginners that I've ever read. Brian writes in a way that makes it easy and fun to learn about using manual settings on a camera. I already had a pretty good grasp of the basics when I got this book, but it also helped me realize a few others things that I had no clue about. I can't recommend this book enough.
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Old 07-18-2007, 08:19 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimThias
I'd like to suggest "Understanding Exposure" by Brian Peterson. It's one of THE best photography books for beginners that I've ever read.
That's ALWAYS the recommendation!

I understand it is really excellent; I've only flipped through it in a bookstore. Given what I had read of his works, and thinking that I understood exposure pretty well (no comments, please, about my ability to achieve good exposure!), I did nonetheless buy a Peterson book but it was "Learning to See Creatively" which more directly addresses what I want to work on. From the reviews I had read, I got the impression that there was some overlap between the two books in the area of creativity so I went for more of the "pure play." For the original poster, definitely Understanding Exposure is the way to go.
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Old 07-19-2007, 04:26 PM   #8
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In attachment 4, it appears that the camera flashed and lit up the milepost sign and left the rest of the stuff, such as the train and caboose dark. That won't work on railpictures.net. Personally, I don't like to use flash, it ruins and blows things out of proportion. It may also make stuff blotchy and make other things less noticable. Try to avoid the flash.

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