Old 07-01-2005, 08:07 AM   #1
Ween
Senior Member
 
Ween's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 4,861
Default Multipoint autofocus question

For those of you with a multipoint focusing system, do actually use the multipoint feature or do you use the center-weighted (I'm drawing a blank on the actual term) focus? Just wanted to get a taste of what's being used.

FYI, I've been using the multipoint with the 350D, and have no experience using anything but...
__________________
Ween is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2005, 03:21 PM   #2
ccaranna
Senior Member
 
ccaranna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 740
Default

I manually use the AF points as much as possible. As I frame a shot, I decide where the strongest point of focus will be and then select the appropriate point.

The only time I let the camera decide on an AF point, (which is called automatic AF point Selection) is when the scene is panoramic, has great depth of field, or the subject takes up the entire frame. Even then, I may override the camera anyway, and select my own focus point it I don't agree with where the camera is choosing to focus.

Now if you decide to manually focus, all bets are off and selecting an AF is not an option. The only time I MF, which is rare for me, is when I feel the camera will have a difficult time auto-focusing. This happens mainly in low light situations, or more complex scenes.
ccaranna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2005, 03:05 PM   #3
Wade H. Massie
Senior Member
 
Wade H. Massie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 115
Default AF points

I usually use the center point and lock focus before the train arrives. The center point is almost always the best and fastest AF sensor on any camera. Using the multi-AF zone tends to result in slower autofocus.

-Wade
__________________
Click Here to view my photos at RailPictures.Net!

www.WadesImages.com
Wade H. Massie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2005, 02:57 AM   #4
Ween
Senior Member
 
Ween's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 4,861
Default

Chuck and Wade,

Thanks for the words. I've been using the AF multi-point and it has been lightning quick with every shot except one (and that one was a hazy, overcast day so I didn't lose any sleep over it). I will have to try both your guy's suggestions and just tinker...
__________________
Ween is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2005, 03:02 AM   #5
4kV
Senior Member
 
4kV's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Homeless, alcoholic drifter with no permanent address
Posts: 653
Default

Chris, I always use center point, and try to get it focused ahead of time. If not, I continually keep focusing on the train as it moves toward me. I have never really even given multifocusing a try. I did have the trouble you had, with hazy days, it sometimes does not seem to know onto what it wants to focus. I get that trouble with ditch light glare, too.
__________________
WTFWDD

Click on n691lf.rrpicturearchives.net for a good laugh and waste of your time.
4kV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2005, 03:13 AM   #6
Ween
Senior Member
 
Ween's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 4,861
Default

I may just need to stop being lazy and manually focus...

But then again, I would have to cease being lazy...
__________________
Ween is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2005, 03:18 AM   #7
4kV
Senior Member
 
4kV's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Homeless, alcoholic drifter with no permanent address
Posts: 653
Default

Manual focus is fine, I use it sometimes, but it seems difficult to do when you are trying to get a moving object.
__________________
WTFWDD

Click on n691lf.rrpicturearchives.net for a good laugh and waste of your time.
4kV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2005, 04:35 AM   #8
ccaranna
Senior Member
 
ccaranna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 740
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ween
I may just need to stop being lazy and manually focus...

But then again, I would have to cease being lazy...
Using the autofocus isn't lazy, it's just practical!

I think manually focusing on a moving target would be very hard to accomplish, especially a train moving with a great amount of speed.

When I select an AF point, I am basically telling the camera where to be ready to focus in a certain situation.

In this shot, I selected the AF point marked red below as you look in the viewfinder: (the x's are just the blank area)
x x - x x
- - - - -
x x - x x


Image ©
PhotoID:
Photograph ©


I wanted the front of the engine to stand out, so I picked an AF point that I thought would coincide with where I wanted it to be in my shot. I also used a wide aperture so that everything that wasn't getting the primary focal attention would turn out to be blurry. (After looking at this shot, I think maybe I should have chosen a slightly smaller aperture so more of the engine with the crew and the first few cars were more in focus.)

It's been fun experimenting with the camera settings. There's definitely been some trial and plenty of errors, but I like to use the Aperture priority mode most of the time, and let the camera choose the shutter speed. I used to use shutter priority primarily, but I think you can get more creative adjusting the aperture. I tried full manual, and will use it occasionally, but it's too much work fiddling with BOTH settings. Talk about lazy!!

Ween, there's a great book I picked up at my local camera joint by Magic Lantern Guides for the Canon 300D. I may have heard you say that you have the XT, but I bet a lot of the features are similar. I learned a lot from it, and I never stop referring to it whenever I have a question!

Last edited by ccaranna; 07-04-2005 at 04:39 AM.
ccaranna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2005, 06:44 AM   #9
E.M. Bell
Senior Member
 
E.M. Bell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Salvisa, Kentucky
Posts: 471
Send a message via MSN to E.M. Bell Send a message via Yahoo to E.M. Bell
Default

When I use AF, I only use the "center point" option. I have tried all of the other setting that Canon has, but they all seem to spend to much time hunting for focus, which is not very groovy when one is shooting a moving target. Most of the time (like 99.9%) I do it the old fashion way, put that little slider on M and trust my eye!

It seems silly to have a camera that can do all the thinking for you, and use it in manual mode all the time, BUT I trust my own senses a lot more than the camera in most situations.
__________________
E.M. Bell, KD4JSL
Salvisa, KY


http://www.jreb.org
NS Fourms http://jreb.org/ns
E.M. Bell is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 05:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.