Old 08-27-2007, 07:04 PM   #1
amtrakboy
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Hi guys!!

I am going to go out today and try my hand at some panning shots, many of which I have seen good examples of on this site. It is a technique I have not really tried yet. Could anyone give me any "starter" advice as to how to pull off this kind of shots? I understand that the train needs to be reasonably sharp, while the background is blurred.
Also, I have here a rejected photo, rejected for "high sun." I took the photo at about 9:30 in the morning, and there were no shadows of the railhead on the rails, to speak of--which I know some people go by in determining whether or not the sun is too high in the sky for pics. All advice/criticisms, etc., much appreciated!!

http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...&key=990219832
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Old 08-27-2007, 07:31 PM   #2
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Can't help with panning, however I think that the photo in the link suffers from the sun not being quite right rather than "high sun". As discussed in THIS THREAD .
The sun is not quite on the front, which you might get away with on something more scenic or less common than an Amtrak.
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Old 08-27-2007, 08:11 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amtrakboy
Hi guys!!

I am going to go out today and try my hand at some panning shots, many of which I have seen good examples of on this site. It is a technique I have not really tried yet. Could anyone give me any "starter" advice as to how to pull off this kind of shots? I understand that the train needs to be reasonably sharp, while the background is blurred.
Also, I have here a rejected photo, rejected for "high sun." I took the photo at about 9:30 in the morning, and there were no shadows of the railhead on the rails, to speak of--which I know some people go by in determining whether or not the sun is too high in the sky for pics. All advice/criticisms, etc., much appreciated!!

http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...&key=990219832
High sun = Overexposed and vice versa in the summer. If you wanna "cheat the system" make sure your photo is not washed out and 'we' don't see high sun. There I said it.
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Old 08-27-2007, 08:16 PM   #4
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Note also that this shot is almost identical to your shot #190349, down to the spot where the orange top of the metal post emerges from the edge of the lead unit! And, if memory is correct, another image discussed here (which, for all I know, may in fact be what eventually became 190349).
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Old 08-27-2007, 08:37 PM   #5
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I am trying to improve on my shots from the past in this location, at different times of day, times of the year, lighting etc., getting the most out of what it has to offer. Thanks for the advice--I'll hang in there and try something different!!
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Old 08-27-2007, 08:43 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amtrakboy
I am trying to improve on my shots from the past in this location, at different times of day, times of the year, lighting etc., getting the most out of what it has to offer. Thanks for the advice--I'll hang in there and try something different!!
Panning is a great idea for that spot, judging by your avatar image. Good luck with that; I've never done one so I have no suggestions. Also, try some verticals instead of horizontals.
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Old 08-27-2007, 08:45 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amtrakboy
I am trying to improve on my shots from the past in this location, at different times of day, times of the year, lighting etc., getting the most out of what it has to offer.
Two words: sunrise and sunset. Not only is it the best lighting you can get but it also allows for the most creativity. Not to mention that sunrise shots are somewhat rare as most people do not get up that early. Just a suggestion. Now if only I could follow my own advice!
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Old 08-27-2007, 09:44 PM   #8
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During this hot weather, I find it very easy to get up at daybreak, since it is so nice and cool that time of day. It is much easier to get up early to go railfanning than it ever was to get up early to go to work!!! LOL
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Old 08-27-2007, 11:25 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew Blaszczyk (2)
Not to mention that sunrise shots are somewhat rare as most people do not get up that early. Just a suggestion. Now if only I could follow my own advice!
I've been trying the early game this summer, and wake up to a bank of a fog a knife couldn't cut

you don't see the sun here in Southern WV till around 10am

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Old 08-28-2007, 03:19 AM   #10
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I gave panning shots a try today, and this is one that I came up with. What do you guys think? I do not plan to submit it for the database, since it is only a practice shot. All criticisms, suggestions, etc., appreciated!!

Pardon the less-than-ideal image quality, since I had to provide a small size sample to get it to upload.
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Old 08-28-2007, 04:51 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbassloyd
I've been trying the early game this summer, and wake up to a bank of a fog a knife couldn't cut
I like the fog at night and in the morning. Gives a cool effect IMO.
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Old 08-28-2007, 04:56 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike B.
I like the fog at night and in the morning. Gives a cool effect IMO.
I'll trade you a big bag of fog, for some of that flatlands midsummer evening light

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Old 08-28-2007, 05:48 AM   #13
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Getting back to part A of said question...

Hey Amtrakboy (if that is your real name), here are some tips I wrote a year back - have a look, they may help. Feel free to ask further questions if necessary.

http://forums.railpictures.net/showt...hlight=panning

Regarding your attached picture, definately a good start.
I try to avoid a going away pan /or pace as I find it less exciting.
Watch the lighting, all the typical rules generally apply, unless you are Ron Flanary (and shoot through the trees), or Andrew and pan with no next to light!

/Mitch
Stop, look and comment!

CLICK HERE to see how a few panned out.

Last edited by Mgoldman; 08-28-2007 at 05:53 AM.
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Old 08-28-2007, 05:54 AM   #14
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Thanks Mitch!! I am going to keep at it until I get the swing of it!! It is fun!!
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