Old 02-13-2007, 03:33 AM   #26
Fotaugrafee, Ink.
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I haven't been to the forums in so long! WOW, I miss threads like this.

People charge me with being pompous when I browbeat the nitwits who complain endlessly (ah hell, I've done my share) about their garbage not getting accepted here at RP. This feels like home, where do I sign up to sandbag this critter?

My advice, learn to take a decent photograph by means of (1) using decent equipment, not the 2.1mpx HP digi-cam that came with your new printer; (2) gain a sense of composition; and (3) learn how to expose the damn thing manually! There is nothing worse than consistently using AUTO for every shot you take. I deal with enough people like that in my other photographic interests.

With all due respect to the valiant effort Tim Huemmer supplies at www.rrpicturearchives.net, the majority of the photos posted there are pure crapola. They are the misfit toys that didn't make Santa's "take out" list, and it shows. I'd say that this guy's photos belong over there. Unfortunately, I viewed this thread far too late to actually see the garbage he submitted.

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Old 02-13-2007, 04:28 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fotaugrafee, Ink.
With all due respect to the valiant effort Tim Huemmer supplies at www.rrpicturearchives.net, the majority of the photos posted there are pure crapola. They are the misfit toys that didn't make Santa's "take out" list, and it shows.
Yes, Tim does a great job, no doubt there. There are a lot of contributors, however, who know nothing more than pointing a cereal box freebie digital camera toward every train they see, then feeling the need to upload every picture they take.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fotaugrafee, Ink.
I'd say that this guy's photos belong over there. Unfortunately, I viewed this thread far too late to actually see the garbage he submitted.
Rest assured, they were indeed garbage. It would have been interesting to have seen your reaction to the guy.

By the way, is that teddy bear on your avatar happy to see us, or does he just have an easy sheep at his disposal?
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Old 03-05-2007, 02:59 AM   #28
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While I agree, the overall quality of the material on that site doesn't touch what is on here, I think that site offers a great service. I use it to post pictures without having to wait for a screener to look at them, or shots that I like and others will enjoy too, but may have a blade of grass in front of the pilot of the engine, thus being rejected from this site. Unless it's a subject I am interested in or someone I know posts quality material there, I rarely just open up galleries there, because most times, it is a waste of time. I don't need to see a contributor pick of a gondola taken at 11 at night.
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Old 03-06-2007, 11:31 PM   #29
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I think the RailPictures Guidlines have tightened up over the years. As they've grown, developed a reputation for quality photos, the standard has been raised.

I have been a contributor here now for approximately four years. Looking back over my photos here, it is clear that I've learned quite a bit from the crowd. Here are some fine examples from myself as a 'learner.' I think I was even using Dad's Nikon CoolPix 4300 at the time!

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... and still one of my favourites (as used by QR complete with RP.Net Copyright Band)
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Old 03-23-2007, 01:26 PM   #30
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How about instead of giving the screeners your crap and taking que spots and being in front of actually worothy shots, you should look around the site at pictures from photographers that HAVE EXPERIENCE! RP does not only accept professional photos, they dont judge on the photographer, it is the QUALITY of the photos. If you are a beginner "of the top", you cant expect to have beautiful panning shots and silhouette's. YOU HAVE TO LEARN ALL OF THAT FIRST, AND TEST IT OUT!!!! Look at you, you act like its the screeners fault you have a bad shot. Well, its not. ITS YOUR FAULT! The screeners are just here to make sure GOOD shots get in. Not just pro shots. They cant take all the photo's. Some suck, some are actually worth the time to look at. Think like this. Would you rather look at a bunch of horrible shots, all crappy and everything, not worth a snot OR a few good ones, that you can tell the photographer put TIME into practicing to get it, and took the time to set up, and is actually worth time to look at? Id take the second choice.
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Old 03-24-2007, 06:30 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelJ
I think the RailPictures Guidlines have tightened up over the years. As they've grown, developed a reputation for quality photos, the standard has been raised.
Agreed...I've experienced this firsthand, and have been sending pictures to post since 2003. With each passing year I get a larger number of rejections. Sometimes the reasons appear to be subjective canned responses, while others are specific like "we don't accept cloudy day photos of common equipment." Pretty hard to send all-sunny pix, when Seattle is mostly cloudy year-round. Last year I posted a picture of a crossing gate in Cokato MN with tank cars rolling past it at 45 mph; it was rejected "because we just don't accept those types of photos here." Within months I saw a photo that was very similar posted on railpictures.net. I've taken shadow shots of locomotives that have gotten rejected, while shadow shots of locomotives by other members get awards. Why? I really couldn't say other than the sunny day rule, or that I just suck at taking pictures...

I've learned much from what I've seen online at railpictures.net, and am thankful for about half of the feedback I've received when uploading photos. But I think I've probably hit a creative wall; my pictures aren't improving enough to make it on the site anymore. I will never consider myself a professional, but I will say that I have worked hard to take photos in a fashion that the website would like. My efforts - and my equipment - do not appear to match the focus of the site any longer. It is what it is. So I've started my own website and also begun posting on rrpicturearchives. I'll send photos to railpictures.net from time to time when I think I've "got a good one," but no longer do I count on getting it published there. If I get a rejection, then I put the photo on my website instead.

Maybe choosing the fate of my own online photos is the greatest lesson I've learned here.
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Old 03-24-2007, 08:36 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WetRailsWA
Agreed...I've experienced this firsthand, and have been sending pictures to post since 2003. With each passing year I get a larger number of rejections.

Maybe choosing the fate of my own online photos is the greatest lesson I've learned here.
I often find myself hoping for the screeners to become more strict.
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Old 03-24-2007, 10:05 PM   #33
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With all due respect, WetRails, "Cokato MN" is seriously overexposed and "shadow shots" is a dull composition and overexposed, nowhere close in quality to those shots that "get awards.". I suspect that you would benefit greatly by spending more time at RP, developing an eye for what makes a good picture. Make use of these forums for feedback, they are excellent.

Don't get me wrong, your "choosing the fate" point is right on and ultimately you should shoot what you want to shoot in the way you want to shoot it. But based on the two shots (only!), I also think you have a lot to learn, especially in terms of knowing what makes a good shot. If you can't tell why these two were rejected, you do not have an eye for shots, in my view.

Regarding Seattle, I sympathize. I have a number of shots from there (I visit my in-laws from time to time) which are composed and exposed well enough for RP but the light simply was not adequate to the task. Overcast, overcast, overcast. I've only gotten in two, both despite the bad light. Frustrating.
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Old 03-24-2007, 11:42 PM   #34
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There seem to be two basic types of posters on the forums. The sore loser who complains that his shot has been rejected and the person who genuinely wants to improve. Wet Rails could benefit from posting his work for comment and then paying attention to the comments.

The "Cokato-MN" shot is way over exposed and the highlights are all blown out. This may be because his camera tried to compensate for the cloudy day, or it may be because he overly lightened the shot in his image processing program. The idea of the photo isn't bad and properly exposed might have gotten in. The "shadow shots" photo has had the contrast raised to the point where the sky is blown out and the foreground is nearly black. I doubt if his camera took the shot that way, so it's probably a case of improper image processing.

Post shots like that on the forums, listen and improve or go away and sulk. It's your choice.

My first thread on RP was almost a year ago, asking for advice on a shot that was rejected for being "too dark." I got a lot of useful feedback but ultimately decided not to resubmit it. I took a much better shot in the same location a year later and got a Screener's Choice from it.

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Old 03-25-2007, 08:08 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRMDC
With all due respect, WetRails, "Cokato MN" is seriously overexposed and "shadow shots" is a dull composition and overexposed, nowhere close in quality to those shots that "get awards.". I suspect that you would benefit greatly by spending more time at RP, developing an eye for what makes a good picture. Make use of these forums for feedback, they are excellent.
I think the two pictures he used as examples of something that got rejected (which he believes shouldn't have been) are two VERY poor examples. I've yet to see a picture on railpics that looks as overexposed at the CokatoMN picture. Regardless if I, or the screeners, agree with whether the composition is appropriate or not for RP, the fact remains, it's WAY overexposed and should have never been submitted in the first place. The screener was probably just trying to be nice by giving the excuse he did.

The second shot is way too dark and a poor composition of a silhouette. I've seen a few silhouette shots on this site, and they are very high in quality. Again, poor choice for an example shot that got rejected to base an argument on.

I don't mean to sound harsh, but you've really got to check yourself when submitting shots here, and exercise a high level of self-control and quality control.

I was fortunate that the very first shot I ever submitted here was accepted. I thought "wow, this is easy!" Well, it wasn't THAT easy. After a few rejections that irritated the hell out of me and even made me start bitching about this site, I took a step back and re-evaluated this site and the type of pictures and quality they accept. After looking at it from a different perspective, I decided to be more picky about the photos I submitted. Since then, I've had the last 12 pictures in row accepted. I don't get out to shoot as much as I'd like, but when I do, I'm more aware of the quality of images I'm taking, due to what I've learned from this site since discovering it four months ago.

Sorry for rambling...I just had to get that out.
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Old 03-26-2007, 07:09 AM   #36
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It would have been fun to have this group at the crossing that day...

"Cokato MN" was a weird one for lighting; everything was white from snow and reflection, but it was late afternoon about 30 minutes before sundown. Pointed to the west all the photos I took were too dark (btw - I never submitted this one). Pointed to the east they came out like the tank car pic. It's the best photo out of 4 or 5 that I took at that crossing. I personally don't see overexposure, because it's exactly how the light was that day - and typically my Olympus C4040 defaults to a darker picture. I liked the shot then, and still like it now. Maybe it's because I had an enjoyable day and the shot is a nice reminder...who knows. It's okay if I'm the only one who likes the photo. At least I got someone to view it by posting it here .

Quote:
Originally Posted by a231pacific
There seem to be two basic types of posters on the forums. The sore loser who complains that his shot has been rejected and the person who genuinely wants to improve. Wet Rails could benefit from posting his work for comment and then paying attention to the comments. Post shots like that on the forums, listen and improve or go away and sulk. It's your choice.
Interesting perspective. Glad to see you posted constructive comments on other strings looking for rejection help. Maybe some of that can come my way on the links towards the bottom of this post. Be decent though...not sure how much longer I'll be a sore loser

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimThias
...and should have never been submitted in the first place.
I disagree. How is a guy to discover what works if he doesn't try?

I like taking train photos, even if I'm not a pro. And with 30 years behind a camera of some kind you could probably bet my skill level will make me a perpetual amateur. That's what I meant about "creative wall." Some folks have it and some folks don't. Does it mean I give up and go home because I can't compose a shot to a subjective standard that eludes me? No, it means I keep taking the shots I like and doing the best I know how to do, because to me they represent more than a photo. Often they represent a day out with my oldest son searching for trains and enjoying his company. I'm okay with being a joe-schmoe photographer...life's too short to get wrapped up in one pursuit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimThias
I don't mean to sound harsh, but you've really got to check yourself when submitting shots here, and exercise a high level of self-control and quality control.
The thing that boggles my mind is that a person can put hours of thought, planning, and editing into a digital photo and still get a response like this quote, which assumes that the shooter picked up a 27-shot disposable and tried to create art. I think we can all safely say that the intent of each photog here is to take the best photo they know how to take, and to use what skill they have to sort out good from bad. Screeners do the rest. Some of you snap/submit photos with more success than others...be thankful for your gift. I suspect there are a number of people out there who have a point-n-shoot eye for photography - like myself - who will never have the strengths of other posters on railpics. You need us; we make you look good. Someone else also said, "If you can't tell why these two were rejected, you do not have an eye for shots, in my view." Interesting comment, but that's sort of like saying, "If I have to explain it, you'll never understand." I've seen forum tips that are more constructive.

I've trolled the forums since late `05 to get tips. Good stuff. From your comments it's clear they didn't help me much, but I will continue to troll. Some of you have asked to see other examples of photos that were rejected. If you're interested, here are some more:

Rejected for being too dark:
http://www.railpixonline.com/SCL_6.htm
http://www.railpixonline.com/dinner_train_04012006.htm

Don't recall what this was rejected for in 2004:
http://www.railpixonline.com/bnsf_2731.htm

Lighting?
http://www.railpixonline.com/BNSF_2189.htm

Constructive comments are always welcome. Thanks.
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Old 03-26-2007, 07:36 AM   #37
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Some of you snap/submit photos with more success than others...be thankful for your gift.
There's no 'gift' in photography, really. Yes, some people have an eye for composition more so than others, but the basics of photography are pretty much a science. Doing X with the camera will lead to Y results. It's about learning how your equpiment works under different circumstances and how to adjust when you know the camera's brain won't keep up. If you have the belief that your "skill level will make me a perpetual amateur," then you have already limited your potential. When you start believing you can do something, that's the first step to getting there.

It's not a lack of skill that's hurting your photography, it's your belief that you're skillz are "not good enough..."
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Old 03-26-2007, 01:39 PM   #38
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WetRailsWa kinda sums it up. You need to go somewhere where the sun shines!
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Old 03-26-2007, 05:57 PM   #39
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I'm glad Wet Rails didn't take his ball and go home. Sticking around and getting past the personal hurt over a rejection is the way to learn. It stings at first, but then you find out that failure is actually the first step on the road to improvement.

Regarding my comment that his "Cokato-MN" shot was over-exposed, he responded

Quote:
Pointed to the east they came out like the tank car pic. It's the best photo out of 4 or 5 that I took at that crossing. I personally don't see overexposure, because it's exactly how the light was that day.
This is where you can learn from having others help you. You don't see overexposure, since you remember the day being gray like that, but look closely at the snow. It's solid white, with no detail. Even on the grayest of days, there are some shadows in the surface irregularities of snow and they will show up, if properly exposed. ALso, look at the tank cars. The car bodies are gray in the photo, not black, as they should be. Finally, look at the sky. There is no detail at all. Even on a gray day, there is some texture that should show up. It's all blown out to white.

Quote:
Maybe it's because I had an enjoyable day and the shot is a nice reminder...who knows. It's okay if I'm the only one who likes the photo
Bottom line, that's why we all take pictures and if you like the shot, then that's fine. Just accept the fact that the rest of us are basing our judgement just on what we see in the image. We don't have the great memories that go with the photo. That's a lesson we all had to learn.

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Old 03-27-2007, 02:04 AM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WetRailsWA
It would have been fun to have this group at the crossing that day...

"Cokato MN" was a weird one for lighting; everything was white from snow and reflection, but it was late afternoon about 30 minutes before sundown. Pointed to the east they came out like the tank car pic. It's the best photo out of 4 or 5 that I took at that crossing. I personally don't see overexposure, because it's exactly how the light was that day - and typically my Olympus C4040 defaults to a darker picture. I liked the shot then, and still like it now.
I never said it wasn't a good composition, it's simply overexposed. You took a longer exposure to get the motion blur, but that resulted in a blown sky, blown signal pole and blown out snow...all overexposed. A neutral density filter would have come in handy for that shot, allowing you that same shutter speed, but not allowing the bright subjects in the picture to get blown out.

By no means was I trying to sound like I was being critical of your photographic "eye" or your skills, I was simply pointing out that the picture was way overexposed and probably should never have been submitted in the first place due to that fact alone because it was bound to be rejected (trust me, I'm pretty sure the screener's eyes are much more picky than mine).

Quote:
Maybe it's because I had an enjoyable day and the shot is a nice reminder...who knows. It's okay if I'm the only one who likes the photo. At least I got someone to view it by posting it here .
I can completely appreciate that sentiment.

Quote:
The thing that boggles my mind is that a person can put hours of thought, planning, and editing into a digital photo and still get a response like this quote, which assumes that the shooter picked up a 27-shot disposable and tried to create art.
Again, I didn't entend to make it sound like I was criticizing your photographic skills. I'm sure your knowledge in photography far exceeds mine, as I've only been using a DSLR for over a year. I've always had the "eye" for it, just never took the time to learn and fully understand the way I do now.

Maybe your eyes were tired the day you submitted that shot and it just didn't look overexposed to you...or perhaps your monitor is darker than mine. When I saw the picture the first time, it just screamed "overexposure" from all the blown whites. I get plenty of those myself, and I've learned to be overly critical of things like that, so perhaps my original comments to you WERE too harsh.

I'm sorry if I offended you in any way...that was not my intention.

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Old 03-27-2007, 04:33 AM   #41
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Originally Posted by WetRailsWA
It's the best photo out of 4 or 5 that I took at that crossing. I personally don't see overexposure, because it's exactly how the light was that day - and typically my Olympus C4040 defaults to a darker picture.
Sounds like you're letting your camera set the exposure, rather than you. I know it may be troublesome to adjust the exposure on the C4040, if it's even possible. But once you start manually adjusting your exposure, you'll become more aware and in turn become a better photographer. If it's at all possible, I highly recommend getting a SLR, digital or not.
That way if a shot is improperly exposed, you won't have the camera to blame, only yourself. After 30 years of shooting, I think you deserve to use a SLR and some better photos.
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Old 03-27-2007, 05:22 AM   #42
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Thank you all, for the honest comments. It's nice to know that photographic experience is a couple clicks away. Instead of just monitoring the forums for feedback on other photos, I'll make sure to enlist this kind of help in the future by posting rejections here. You've sold me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ween
There's no 'gift' in photography, really. Yes, some people have an eye for composition more so than others, but the basics of photography are pretty much a science. Doing X with the camera will lead to Y results. It's about learning how your equpiment works under different circumstances and how to adjust when you know the camera's brain won't keep up. If you have the belief that your "skill level will make me a perpetual amateur," then you have already limited your potential. When you start believing you can do something, that's the first step to getting there.

It's not a lack of skill that's hurting your photography, it's your belief that you're skillz are "not good enough..."
I truly believe there is a gift involved with photography, just like someone might have the gift of music (my wife) or even gab for that matter (her step-mom). And I believe a lot of you have one. Yes, there is science. Filters, Kodachrome, Ansel Adams and The Zone Method and all that (if I'm influenced by anything camera based, it would be his use of contrast). But in an unusual move, photography also adds the subjective eye to that science. Therefore, I don't believe it's as simple as x leads to y. There's "the feeling" that the shot is right, which is then backed up by the ability of the equipment you carry. I think this is where I fall short; where I see a great shot with my subjective eye, one filled with a nice steam engine and great Northwest fall foliage, a screener sees too dark. Yes, frustrating but not the end of the world. It's akin to the trombone player who loves big-brass jazz and plays well in 2nd chair, but falls flat as a soloist. You've got lead guitarists (Eric Clapton), and you've got rythm guitarists (Bruce Springsteen and Pete Townsend). They're all musicians (darn good ones at that), and each one has a gift for a certain type. I am comfortable as 2nd chair. If I were to claim a photographic gift of some kind, it would be passion for the shot even if I'm only able to back it up with basic skill.

You make a good point; maybe I am limiting myself by saying that I'm not good enough; probably time for me to listen to more coaches. Given the round a commentary here, I will keep trying and make an effort to learn from the people who do have the eye. With time, maybe that basic skill of mine could get a jump start.

Thanks again and enjoy the week.
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Old 03-27-2007, 03:02 PM   #43
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First of all, great to see that you are taking a positive attitude toward all of this. You will be producing better pictures soon!

Quote:
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I truly believe there is a gift involved with photography, just like someone might have the gift of music (my wife) or even gab for that matter (her step-mom).
There is a gift, I believe, in having a strong vision of composition. Many don't have that gift. As a result, you see many ordinary "wedgie" shots at RP and elsewhere. Just check my hard disk!

Nonetheless, wedgies are still pleasant to look at and people who like trains like to see pictures of trains. So they are perfectly fine, no matter how "un-artistic" the composition. But one wants to see them properly exposed and processed. That part of photography is not art and involves no gift, just knowledge properly applied. That, you (and I!) can work on; there is a lot to accomplish in that aspect of photography, and the results are worth it. A few months or years down the road you can compare the shots you have had rejected today with similar shots from the same spot, and you will see your own improvement.

Quote:
The thing that boggles my mind is that a person can put hours of thought, planning, and editing into a digital photo and still get a response like this quote, which assumes that the shooter picked up a 27-shot disposable and tried to create art.
Maybe belaboring the point, but the reason you got the responses you did is because your stuff did look like you picked up a disposable. Perhaps your hours of planning, etc., went to waste because you don't yet have a basic set of technical photography skills. Thankfully, those can be aquired by anyone, no matter their "gifts" or lack thereof.

I look forward to seeing your stuff get better and better and showing up in the database with regularity.
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Old 03-27-2007, 03:25 PM   #44
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Glad to see you are getting engaged in what these forums are all about...sharing ideas and improving photographic skills.

I agree, there are people with an eye for photography. I know several of them and after watching them closely over the years, I realize that it is a gift. The rest of us can learn to take some pretty darn good pictures, but that next level that makes one an artist may be beyond us. Personally, I don't worry about it.

Sounds like Wet Rails' first step is to figure out why his camera does what it does. Does it spot meter, average meter or center weight? Of his two Cokato shots, one was too dark and one was to light. The dark one may have been reading off the headlights of the locomotives, or off the sky. The too light one was evidently reading off the black tank cars and trying to turn them into 18% gray, which is what light meters do. Learning how to manually set exposures or how to trick the auto into doing what you want is an important first step.

Next, recognize that gray day shots probably aren't going to make it on RP, unless they are extraordinary. We all have dark day shots that we thought were pretty neat, but generally the screeners won't agree. If it's raining, you need light reflecting off rails, reflections in puddles, dramatic fog or clouds, etc. Take a look at the Screener's Choices. There are some shots in there by Kerry Klarr and others that will show you how you can make unusual lighting, or lack thereof, succeed.

Look at the work of others and see if you can figure out what they are doing and how you can learn from them. Since RP has a great search function, figure out who the good shooters are and take some time and scroll through their past work. Here are two samples from one of RP's best young photographers.

Image © Andrew Blaszczyk (2)
PhotoID: 172929
Photograph © Andrew Blaszczyk (2)


Image © Andrew Blaszczyk (2)
PhotoID: 172838
Photograph © Andrew Blaszczyk (2)


I chose them because they have some of the same ideas as your "Cokato-MN" photo, with the use of blur. Do some exploring and I'm sure you will find plenty of shots to learn from or be inspired by.

Good luck.

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Old 03-28-2007, 03:44 AM   #45
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Pretty hard to send all-sunny pix, when Seattle is mostly cloudy year-round.
You gave me the idea of revisiting some of my Seattle stuff. I actually got one in today despite the clouds, thanks, maybe, to a bit of fog that rolled onto the top of a tall structure:

Image © Janusz Mrozek
PhotoID: 181288
Photograph © Janusz Mrozek


PS I actually have now linked this pic into THREE threads! Am I a sick-o or what? Not that it matters, NOOBODY is looking at it! Oh well, good thing I shoot for myself first. Hope I get to go back there in sunlight some day (but then it will be fully backlit so it won't be easy, although there are some nearby spots where one can put the sun behind the back).
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Old 03-30-2007, 05:26 PM   #46
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You gave me the idea of revisiting some of my Seattle stuff. I actually got one in today despite the clouds, thanks, maybe, to a bit of fog that rolled onto the top of a tall structure:

Image © Janusz Mrozek
PhotoID: 181288
Photograph © Janusz Mrozek
Awesome! I think that's a great shot man...congratulations on getting it posted. I know exactly where that is - Elliott and Lee! My son found that spot, mostly by accident, while on our way between the BNSF Interbay yard and Holgate; looked over one day and BLAM..."Look, Daddy...Santa Fe!" There it was, an SD40 overwhelming the building next to it.

This photo was taken at that location as well: http://www.railpixonline.com/bnsf_6805.htm



Anyone like to share feedback on this photo?

In Seattle, I think a person must be creative and sneaky a lot of the time to get shots that have soul. It's a place where there's plenty of - what did folks call them - wedgie shots? I'm still finding places to take photos that will stand on their own merits, most of them extremely urban and cramped down around SODO and Georgetown.

As a sideline, it's probably a good time to start documenting the Spirit Of Washington Dinner Train, before its last run on the Eastside in late July `07.
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Old 03-30-2007, 08:07 PM   #47
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I sort of like and sort of don't like the shot. It's well composed and exposed and I like the train and the scenery, but just don't like the orange air hoses in the foreground. They draw the eye away from the rest of the shot with their bright color. I wonder if Janusz framed his shot the way he did because of those hoses?

RP probably would hit you for being back lit, but I happen to like back lit shots, so I'm not the one to advise you there!

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Old 03-30-2007, 09:25 PM   #48
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I sort of like and sort of don't like the shot. It's well composed and exposed and I like the train and the scenery, but just don't like the orange air hoses in the foreground. They draw the eye away from the rest of the shot with their bright color. I wonder if Janusz framed his shot the way he did because of those hoses?

RP probably would hit you for being back lit, but I happen to like back lit shots, so I'm not the one to advise you there!

Michael Allen
Good point about the air hoses. Darn sun...always on the wrong side of the world, keeping me from getting good shots Maybe if I stood on my head and turned the camera upside down. Wait, that won't work....
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Old 03-30-2007, 09:31 PM   #49
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I sort of like and sort of don't like the shot. It's well composed and exposed and I like the train and the scenery, but just don't like the orange air hoses in the foreground. They draw the eye away from the rest of the shot with their bright color. I wonder if Janusz framed his shot the way he did because of those hoses?

RP probably would hit you for being back lit, but I happen to like back lit shots, so I'm not the one to advise you there!

Michael Allen
Honestly, this was shot a few years ago, I was a bit less creative and less skilled then, and I suspect all I was doing was trying to get the train and the elevator in the frame; I probably would not have noticed the hoses, much less thought about them as an element of the image. Today, as a matter of personal preference, I tend to like details like hoses even though they may be detrimental to the image in non-railfan compositional terms. I like capturing the rail infrastructure detail - not that I DO it often, but I LIKE to!


As for Wet's image, of course RP is likely to kick it because of the backlighting, but it is very nice for the personal collection; remember not to shoot just for RP but also for yourself. One comment, however, the lead engine is directly overlapping the top of the elevator, detracting from the presense of the latter and creating a bit of lack of separation of elements of the image. And especially since it's such a cool elevator!

Wet, and anyone else, at http://mysite.verizon.net/~jmrozek/ in the left column near the top you can find another image from that visit. Although almost certainly not RP-worthy, I am somewhat fond of it and think of it as an abstract study in lines and gray. Another abstract is attached; if I had not chopped off the truck on the right I would be happier with it.
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File Type: jpg BNSF.AmgenSeattleWA080605 (11).jpg (258.2 KB, 156 views)
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Old 03-30-2007, 11:46 PM   #50
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Wet, and anyone else, at http://mysite.verizon.net/~jmrozek/ in the left column near the top you can find another image from that visit.
Ahhh....the Garbage Train. Lot of grey in that photo but cool nonetheless.
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