Old 11-18-2009, 06:46 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by coborn35 View Post
Could this be stickied?
Doesn't appear that I am able to do so. Perhaps the admins can?

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Old 11-19-2009, 01:29 AM   #27
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excellent advice, i dont have the time to read it all, but once i arrive at the station inn and things slow down i'll certainly give it a good read as i'll be buying a Canon Rebel XS in the near future and would love to take great time exposure shots.
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Old 11-19-2009, 03:50 PM   #28
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Chase,
When you "paint with light" do you hold the light on one spot or do you move the light around to other parts of the loco duing the exposure?
RH
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Old 11-19-2009, 04:34 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron H View Post
Chase,
When you "paint with light" do you hold the light on one spot or do you move the light around to other parts of the loco duing the exposure?
RH
Well im not Chase but when you paint with light you pretty much do what the name implies, paint. You slowly and evenly paint the entire frame with the light, you have to be careful though as if not done correctly it will leave streak marks which really take away from the photo. I recommend a flashlight of atleast 1 to two million candlepower.

Here are a couple examples.

Image © Walter Scriptunas II - www.scriptunasimages.com
PhotoID: 301761
Photograph © Walter Scriptunas II - www.scriptunasimages.com


Image © WalterS - www.scriptunasimages.smugmug.com
PhotoID: 243685
Photograph © WalterS - www.scriptunasimages.smugmug.com


Image © WalterS - www.scriptunasimages.smugmug.com
PhotoID: 243564
Photograph © WalterS - www.scriptunasimages.smugmug.com
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Old 11-19-2009, 05:46 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron H View Post
Chase,
When you "paint with light" do you hold the light on one spot or do you move the light around to other parts of the loco duing the exposure?
RH
Ron,

I move the light around to whatever part of the subject I want to have light on. Generally, depending on the angle of which I am applying the light, I will paint the locomotives and the first couple of cars. The goal is to paint everything equally.

Image © Chase55671
PhotoID: 296216
Photograph © Chase55671


The above shot was taken at 18". I painted the entire lead locomotive twice. Or In other words, going over the entire engine twice with my 2 million candlelight power spotlight.

This one was a bit more tricky, as I wanted to show off the first couple of cars to give viewers more to look at, but since the cars were further way from my camera/spotlight, I had to apply more light to them just to notice them.

Image © Chase55671
PhotoID: 293783
Photograph © Chase55671


Hope this helps,
Chase
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Old 11-19-2009, 05:54 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Walter S View Post
Well im not Chase but when you paint with light you pretty much do what the name implies, paint. You slowly and evenly paint the entire frame with the light, you have to be careful though as if not done correctly it will leave streak marks which really take away from the photo. I recommend a flashlight of atleast 1 to two million candlepower.
Agreed. If you look at Walter's first shot, it seems there's a little tiny bit of streaking. Below are some examples where streaking can be noticed:

Image © Christopher Blaszczyk
PhotoID: 200049
Photograph © Christopher Blaszczyk

Image © Andrew Blaszczyk (2)
PhotoID: 237062
Photograph © Andrew Blaszczyk (2)

Image © Christopher Blaszczyk
PhotoID: 237325
Photograph © Christopher Blaszczyk


A lot of times, you don't need to light the whole scene, but just let the flashlight brighten certain areas, like a dark nose:

Image © Christopher Blaszczyk
PhotoID: 217088
Photograph © Christopher Blaszczyk

Image © Christopher Blaszczyk
PhotoID: 207718
Photograph © Christopher Blaszczyk

Image © Christopher Blaszczyk
PhotoID: 193424
Photograph © Christopher Blaszczyk


And some of my favorites, all lit by a $15 2-million candle flashlight from Home Depot:

Image © Andrew Blaszczyk (2)
PhotoID: 203005
Photograph © Andrew Blaszczyk (2)

Image © Christopher Blaszczyk
PhotoID: 254280
Photograph © Christopher Blaszczyk

Image © Christopher Blaszczyk
PhotoID: 218845
Photograph © Christopher Blaszczyk


- Chris
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Old 11-19-2009, 05:58 PM   #32
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Image © Chase55671
PhotoID: 296216
Photograph © Chase55671

Image © Chase55671
PhotoID: 293783
Photograph © Chase55671
Chase's two shots are the perfect example of the streaking effect that Walter talked about. Note how in the two photos, there are certain hot spots, in the grass and ballast especially, which the photographer illuminated with the flashlight more than the surrounding area.

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Old 11-19-2009, 06:15 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cblaz View Post
Chase's two shots are the perfect example of the streaking effect that Walter talked about. Note how in the two photos, there are certain hot spots, in the grass and ballast especially, which the photographer illuminated with the flashlight more than the surrounding area.

- Chris
Exactly Chris, on mine the first was done with a Black in Decker light, unfortunately the width of the front isnt all that wide and does make it more trickier, I have been trying to find a larger one. it was alot more noticeable before I edited it also. The last two I used a friends light which had a very large front and seemed alot easier to paint with.

Just like real painting, the bigger the brush, the easier it is to fill a canvas.
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Old 11-19-2009, 06:54 PM   #34
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I would also imagine it is far easier to light a steam engine. I've found that applying a spotlight to a modern diesel will generally result with an overpowering glare caused by the reflective tape. I've found this to be quite distracting and even in some cases, cause me to rely on ambient light for taking night images.

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Old 11-19-2009, 07:40 PM   #35
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Thanks Chase,
That helps a lot and now to do some brain storming and pay a visit to the FEC Fort Lauderdale yard some night real soon.
RH
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Old 11-19-2009, 07:45 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by Chase55671 View Post
I've found that applying a spotlight to a modern diesel will generally result with an overpowering glare caused by the reflective tape. I've found this to be quite distracting and even in some cases, cause me to rely on ambient light for taking night images.
The problem there is shining the light from a position too close to your camera. That reflective tape reflects the light straight back towards the source, which, if you're standing next to your camera, will cause that glare. If you apply the light at an angle (standing some distance away from your camera) you should get better results.

We took this photo with a series of flashbulbs, none of which were near the camera. As a result, there's no glare on the tape:

Image ©
PhotoID:
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Old 11-19-2009, 07:46 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chase55671 View Post
I would also imagine it is far easier to light a steam engine. I've found that applying a spotlight to a modern diesel will generally result with an overpowering glare caused by the reflective tape. I've found this to be quite distracting and even in some cases, cause me to rely on ambient light for taking night images.

Chase

No, not really if you know what your doing.
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Old 11-19-2009, 09:11 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ottergoose View Post
The problem there is shining the light from a position too close to your camera. That reflective tape reflects the light straight back towards the source, which, if you're standing next to your camera, will cause that glare. If you apply the light at an angle (standing some distance away from your camera) you should get better results.

We took this photo with a series of flashbulbs, none of which were near the camera. As a result, there's no glare on the tape:

Image ©
PhotoID:
Photograph ©
Nick, thanks for the information. I'll definitely have to try this out! I would imagine my results would be far more appealing if the reflective tape wasn't a major distraction.

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Old 11-22-2009, 02:41 AM   #39
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Rather than creating a new thread, I figured I'd just add my question to this thread, since I will be staying mainly on topic.

One thing I haven't had the chance to fiddle with is night photography during a snow storm, or atleast, while snow is on the ground.

I know during the daylight hours when snow is present, it is quite easy to blow out the snow. I was wondering if the same thing would apply for photographing night scenes that include snow on the ground.

David Honan has captured some stunning photos at night while snow is present, but I was hoping for additional opinions. Does anyone have any suggestions/tips for night photography and snow?

I haven't had the opportunity to photograph too many snow scenes at all, regardless if it is day or night, as it seems the roads are always covered when a good storm hits. Plus, being out here in West Virginia, CSX shuts down the railroad as soon as a dusting pops up, as there are some places that don't get treated too well out in the middle of nowhere, thus resulting in a taxi or other crew transport can having trouble reaching the crew.

Any insight is appreciated.

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Old 11-22-2009, 02:13 PM   #40
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Chase-

At night, for the most part, you control the light - snow on the ground or not. So you can control how much is falling on the snow and not blow it out. Also, since it's white it makes a nice reflector, giving you the ability to get some light underneath things that would be tough with direct lighting. It just takes some practice.

This one was 100% ambient light.
Image © Thomas J. Nanos - www.nanosphoto.com
PhotoID: 227401
Photograph © Thomas J. Nanos - www.nanosphoto.com


And ambient mixed with Lumedyne flash (and the Big Dipper)
Image © Thomas J. Nanos - www.nanosphoto.com
PhotoID: 266848
Photograph © Thomas J. Nanos - www.nanosphoto.com


As for during active snowfall, I don't have any on the database here, but if you click the link below, you'll be whisked away to a post on my blog from this past March when I shot the NECR idling away in a snowstorm. The key to not getting white blobs in the frame is the same with the Scotchlite on the locomotives - don't light from around your camera.

http://www.nanosphoto.com/blog/2009/...necr-at-night/

Oh, yeah, and one more shot from that evening is here:

http://www.nanosphoto.com/blog/2009/...-2009-contest/

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Old 11-23-2009, 01:22 AM   #41
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Well im not Chase but when you paint with light you pretty much do what the name implies, paint. You slowly and evenly paint the entire frame with the light, you have to be careful though as if not done correctly it will leave streak marks which really take away from the photo. I recommend a flashlight of atleast 1 to two million candlepower.
You learn something new everyday, with these shortened days we have now, I think I'm going to start practicing that!
Thanks Walter & Chase
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Old 11-24-2009, 12:34 AM   #42
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Here is another example of painting with light, non trains though.



http://www.flickr.com/photos/rodcunha/369530699/
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Old 11-24-2009, 12:57 AM   #43
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Chase-

At night, for the most part, you control the light - snow on the ground or not. So you can control how much is falling on the snow and not blow it out. Also, since it's white it makes a nice reflector, giving you the ability to get some light underneath things that would be tough with direct lighting. It just takes some practice.

This one was 100% ambient light.
Image © Thomas J. Nanos - www.nanosphoto.com
PhotoID: 227401
Photograph © Thomas J. Nanos - www.nanosphoto.com


And ambient mixed with Lumedyne flash (and the Big Dipper)
Image © Thomas J. Nanos - www.nanosphoto.com
PhotoID: 266848
Photograph © Thomas J. Nanos - www.nanosphoto.com


As for during active snowfall, I don't have any on the database here, but if you click the link below, you'll be whisked away to a post on my blog from this past March when I shot the NECR idling away in a snowstorm. The key to not getting white blobs in the frame is the same with the Scotchlite on the locomotives - don't light from around your camera.

http://www.nanosphoto.com/blog/2009/...necr-at-night/

Oh, yeah, and one more shot from that evening is here:

http://www.nanosphoto.com/blog/2009/...-2009-contest/

-Tom
Thanks Tom for the information! It's greatly appreciated.

Chase
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