Old 06-20-2008, 01:39 AM   #1
khalucha
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Default Metering Mode

What type of metering mode is everyone using on their cameras?

I have a Canon 40D and I was using "Evaluative" but I just switched to "Center-Weighted". I have not tried to shoot anything yet in this mode but I am hoping that is might have some better effects on my shots.

Any input?
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Old 06-20-2008, 01:41 AM   #2
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My focusing and metering is all center point. I really don't have a need for anything else.
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Old 06-20-2008, 01:42 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimThias
My focusing and metering is all center point. I really don't have a need for anything else.
Ditttttto!
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Old 06-20-2008, 03:52 AM   #4
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Center weighted seems to be the way to go, just watch those headlights as they can throw off your metering and make the image dark if you meter with them in the center of the frame.

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Old 06-20-2008, 04:22 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by Mustang11
Center weighted seems to be the way to go, just watch those headlights as they can throw off your metering and make the image dark if you meter with them in the center of the frame.

Brian
Found that out the hard way more than once over the course of a year. I'm happy to report metering is fully manual now so that middle dot can be anywhere on the loco!
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Old 06-20-2008, 05:52 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew Blaszczyk (2)
Found that out the hard way more than once over the course of a year. I'm happy to report metering is fully manual now so that middle dot can be anywhere on the loco!
Of course, you could have saved more shots if you shot RAW
Better yet - Why not just plunge straight into manual?
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Old 06-20-2008, 10:01 AM   #7
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ISO 200 @ 1/500 F10 may not meter at all if its sunny. Just look the histogram. From film days that makes the shots more constant if putting a show on, less light to dark shots.
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Old 06-21-2008, 02:07 PM   #8
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Well, I think evaluative is not the way if you mean to control your photograph. As evaluative, matrix, automatic etc. metering uses a complex algorithm you cannot guess how it will react to a certain light and cannot adjust. Of course, shooting tests and adjusting is a way, but it eats your shutter, may be fooled when the train actually appears and really amateuristic. You can do test shots to see if it's in the dynamics of your sensor but serious photography will only come if you control your camera and not your camera controls you. It may work all right at a sunny morning with no clouds and homogenous background but otherwise it's a Russian Roulette.
Which metering to use then? It's decided by the kind of photo you're going to take.
Spot-metering is primarily used in studios. I only adwise using it if you set your camera manually, you set a shutter speed, an aperture and an ISO and leave out the software from the game. Then you can check with the spotmeter that compared to the set exposure certain regions of your future shot are how much lighter or darker. For example you may learn that the sky is 2 EV lighter, the dark forest in the background is 3 stops darker than your set exposure. It seems to be all right, but when you point your spotmeter on a bright cloud you may see that certain spots on the cloud seem to be +4 EV to your exposure and will burn out. Spot metering is the choice when you want to know exactly how much lighter and darker ar smaller parts of your mage than your overall exposure beforehand. It's good use for tunnel portal shots, night shots with many different light sources or to see how many cars will be visible in the darkness of your image.
The problem with spot metering may be that if you meter on your train you can easily point the middle of your sensor towards a darker area of it and fool the meter. If you point the small spot metering area (~2% of the entire frame) to the darg grey of a BNSF locomotive the software will assume it's middle-grey (an 18% grey that our eye recognizes as halfway between black and white - a great demonstration of how different our sight is from reality) and expose accordingly. Imagine how bright yellow the rest of the body would be if the near-blacks are exposed to be halfway between black and white! So I adwise not to use spot metering with any kind of semi-automatic exposure program. Use manual setting and spot (if you have much time and a difficult situation to manage) or use A or S/T mode with center-weighted metering and some exposure correction in simple situations and when you have to be quick. CW metering will produce more reliable exposure though less accurate.
The best with CW is that it is predictable. After using it for half a year I think anyone can guess how much exposure correction to add in certain light conditions. You can use center-weighted metering and the software of your camera together safely with a guarantee that your shots will be somewhere near perfection. For perfection you have to add yourself naturally.
I always put away my camera set to aperture program, f/8 ISO200 -1EV exposure correction and CW metering. From sunrise till sunset this can work for nearly any snapshot in every possible condition with the adjustment of only one parameter which is fast enough for snap shots.

I hope this helps!
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Old 06-21-2008, 03:08 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Benbe
The best with CW is that it is predictable. After using it for half a year I think anyone can guess how much exposure correction to add in certain light conditions.

Bingo!
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Old 06-21-2008, 03:09 PM   #10
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Obviously, it doesn't count the quote! I guess because the quote is not a contribution to the thread.

EDIT: what, Jim, you dumped your comment as I was responding to it? Or is it now counting the quote?
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Old 06-21-2008, 03:22 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by benbe
serious photography will only come if you control your camera and not your camera controls you.
I agree with the above, but the following quote seems like a contradiction...

Quote:
Originally Posted by benbe
I always put away my camera set to aperture program
Wouldn't shooting in Manual mode give you the most control, especially over Shutter or Aperature mode?
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Old 06-21-2008, 03:26 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ween
I agree with the above, but the following quote seems like a contradiction...



Wouldn't shooting in Manual mode give you the most control, especially over Shutter or Aperature mode?
It is good advice for putting away the camera and then having it set to decent setting for shooting what he said, snapshots. It is a good idea to have the camera ready so that, if you have to, you can put it to your eye and shoot quickly and get something decent.
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Old 06-21-2008, 03:29 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRMDC
It is good advice for putting away the camera and then having it set to decent setting for shooting what he said, snapshots. It is a good idea to have the camera ready so that, if you have to, you can put it to your eye and shoot quickly and get something decent.
True, but I couldn't tell if he regularly shoots in Tv or Ta...if so, then my pondering is still legit.
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Old 06-21-2008, 03:38 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ween
True, but I couldn't tell if he regularly shoots in Tv or Ta...if so, then my pondering is still legit.
Given that he had a zillion sentences jammed together, with barely evident paragraph breaks, I couldn't tell you what he regularly shoots either, as I skimmed it!

Anyway, regardless of whether he shoots Tv, Ta, M, P, mountains, fireworks, whatever, his idea is good.
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Old 06-21-2008, 08:46 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRMDC
Obviously, it doesn't count the quote! I guess because the quote is not a contribution to the thread.
Well, it has before.

Quote:
EDIT: what, Jim, you dumped your comment as I was responding to it? Or is it now counting the quote?
Yeah, I changed my mind about what I wanted to say. Instead I just hit return and used a smiley to make up the 10 digits necessary.
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Old 06-22-2008, 02:30 PM   #16
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OK. Thanks a million for everyone that responded. I have some playing around to do.

I do have one question though, what is Ta? I have not heard of that one before.

When I shoot in RAW I shoot in Av mode. I guess it is time to play around more.

Thanks again.

Kevin
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