Old 08-04-2009, 09:40 PM   #1
Slickrick339889
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How do you take pictures of a train headed straight into the sun without getting rejected for being backlit? I assume it's because the side of the train is in the shadow, but both sides are. A lot of pictures on here don't have perfect nose light or side light but are still good pictures. Suggestions...

The color looks a little off to me as well but I'm not quite sure how.

http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...&key=372135295

http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...&key=870246450

http://www.railpictures.net/viewreje...d=716460&key=0
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Old 08-04-2009, 09:51 PM   #2
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Easy...you go earlier in the summer mornings when that angle is very nicely lit. By about 800am this time of year, the light doesn't work as well for that shot.
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Old 08-04-2009, 10:58 PM   #3
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The photos are backlit, because the side of train is dark, even though the nose is lit. Solution? Go to the other side of the tracks.
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Old 08-04-2009, 11:19 PM   #4
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Is it just me or do all the shots look super soft and almost blurry?

I don't have an issue with the first shot being "backlit", the light is just sub-par and it's incredibly soft on my laptop screen.
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Old 08-05-2009, 02:35 AM   #5
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I agree with Steven about the images being quite soft. Also, Cory, in the third link, remember to keep an eye out for headlight ghosts -- look in the sky above and immediately to the right of the left-most searchlight signal.
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Old 08-05-2009, 03:24 AM   #6
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Alright thanks for the suggestions. The ghost is interesting...what causes that and how do I avoid it? Do I just edit it out of the picture?

If they are soft do I just use the sharpen feature to take care of that problem?

Do I re-edit these or just shoot some other pictures later?
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Old 08-05-2009, 03:25 AM   #7
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Shoot as the situation warrants. If the sun is shining straight down the tracks, don't shoot like the sun is over your back illuminating the side of the train. That's like setting up for a goal line jump over the line offensive stand...... when your team is on the 50 yard line and it's 2nd and 24.

Either move to another location or put on a tele lens and shoot as head on a shot as you can.
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Old 08-05-2009, 03:50 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe the Photog View Post
Either move to another location or put on a tele lens and shoot as head on a shot as you can.
There, the nail has really been hit on the head. Sometimes I actually enjoy taking shots of the type:

Image © Carl Becker
PhotoID: 288421
Photograph © Carl Becker

Image © Carl Becker
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Photograph © Carl Becker


Both of these were taken at at least 360mm equiv., but it's possible with around 300mm typically.

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Old 08-11-2009, 04:35 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slickrick339889 View Post
Alright thanks for the suggestions. The ghost is interesting...what causes that and how do I avoid it? Do I just edit it out of the picture?
The easy way it to clone them out.

The way to avoid them is better optics on your camera. I used to have a lot of issues with the green headlight ghosts, I had previously been using a bottom end UV filter on my DSLR lens, when I replaced it with a more expensive multi-coated filter it only happens in low lighting conditions.
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Old 08-11-2009, 05:43 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevenmwelch View Post
Is it just me or do all the shots look super soft and almost blurry?
Same here, though my thought was more poor image quality rather than just soft / blurry. It certainly looks as if the sun was actually on the other side of the tracks, but would still possibly be "high sun" (look at the length of the shadow). I would find another location to shoot from at that time of the morning where the sun is not at such an acute angle to the railroad.
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