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Old 06-01-2014, 04:54 PM   #1
Chris Kilroy
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Default Updated Rejection Reasons

Hi everyone,

As I promised a couple weeks ago, we have updated/modified our "reasons for rejection" in an attempt to be more detailed and clear about what we're thinking during the screening process. These changes went into effect last evening.

In the spirit of transparency, and because none of you will hopefully ever see any of these firsthand , I'm sharing the complete updated list here.

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Bad Angle: The angle from which the image was composed is poor. This can include extreme angles below or above the subject, uninteresting angles on roster shots, and images in which the train is going away from the viewer.

becomes

Angle (Going Away): Photos in which the train is traveling away from the photographer, or roster shots focusing on the rear of the subject, are generally not accepted. Exceptions are made for artistic and/or unique images.


Angle (Extreme): The angle from which the image was composed is awkward and/or extreme, usually meaning that the photo was taken from too far below or above the subject.

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Blurry

becomes

Blurry: The subject of the image is blurry, which is most often caused by too much camera movement or an insufficient shutter speed setting.

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Bad Color: Not enough color depth or too much color saturation.

becomes

Color (Hue): The hue (color cast) of the photo is poor; i.e. there is too much of a certain color throughout the image. Please see the screener comments field for suggestions on how this may be fixed.


Color (Saturation High): The image features too much color saturation, making the colors look overly vivid and unrealistic.


Color (Saturation Low): The image does not have enough color saturation, making the colors look flat and bland.

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Bad Contrast: The image suffers from either too much or too little contrast

becomes

Contrast (Low): The contrast (relative difference between light/dark areas) is too low, making the image look washed out.


Contrast (High): The contrast (relative difference between light/dark areas) is too high, making the image lose its tonal depth.

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Copyright Too Large: Please limit the size/length of text that you place on your images; text too large detracts from the overall image.

unchanged

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Bad Cropping (Edges): There are visible scan edges, slide frames, etc. in the uploaded image.

changed to

Processing (Edges): There are visible scan edges, slide frames, or unremoved white backgrounds in the image. Images containing artificial borders are also not accepted.

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Too Much Compression: Using too much JPEG compression when saving pixelates the image.

becomes

Too Much Compression: Saving your image with too much JPEG compression has caused the image to become very pixelated. This can often be accompanied by noticeable blotches in the sky. Try saving your image at your photo editor's highest image quality setting.

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Part of Subject Cut Off/Missing

unchanged

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Front Coupled: Roster shots with front coupled locomotives are generally not accepted.

becomes

Front Coupled: Roster shots with front coupled locomotives, as well as tightly composed photos of locomotives coupled in the middle of a consist, are generally not accepted. This reason may also apply to photos where end of train helper/pusher locomotives are front coupled against the train.

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Horizon Unlevel: Try leveling the image in your photo editing software.

becomes

Horizon Unlevel (Leaning Left): The horizon of the image is leaning to the left, and needs to be corrected with clockwise rotation. A level horizon, in most cases, should be ascertained by ensuring that an object which is known to be vertical, such as a structure, nearest to the center of the frame aligns with the grid lines in your photo editor.

Horizon Unlevel (Leaning Right): The horizon of the image is leaning to the right, and needs to be corrected with counterclockwise rotation. A level horizon, in most cases, should be ascertained by ensuring that an object which is known to be vertical, such as a structure, nearest to the center of the frame aligns with the grid lines in your photo editor.

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Heat Distortion: Visible image distortion caused by heat waves.

unchanged

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Poor lighting (Backlit): The image is backlit or doesn't feature enough light on the nose or visible sides of the subject.

becomes

Backlit (Nose): The nose of the lead unit is too dark due to backlighting. (Removed reference to 50% to give us a little more flexibility)

Backlit (Side): The visible side of the train does not feature enough light.

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Poor lighting (Cloudy): Common angle cloudy day shots of common/standard power are generally not accepted.

becomes

Lighting (Cloudy): Cloudy day shots of common/standard power, as well as cloudy images of common/standard angles and scenes, are generally not accepted.

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Lighting (Dark): The image is too dark.

unchanged

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Poor Lighting (High Sun): The angle of the sunlight is too high, a common problem in the summer months of year on mid-day shots.

becomes

Lighting (High Sun): The angle of the sunlight is too high, a common problem during midday hours during the summer. High sun is considered to be present when there are extended shadows on the underframe of the train, the plow, long vertical grab iron shadows, and generally harsh light on the visible vertical surfaces of the train.

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Digitally Manipulated

becomes

Digitally Manipulated: The image has been modified so that it no longer represents the original scene. Examples of manipulation include the cloning (removal) of light poles, wires, fences, people, etc. as well as the digital introduction of elements that were not present in the original image.

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Too Much Noise/Grain: Noise is the digital equivalent of grain.

unchanged

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Obstructing Objects (Foreground Clutter)

becomes

Clutter (Foreground): The image contains unsightly clutter (fences, trees, weeds, etc.) which is either obstructing part of the train, or is large enough to detract from the overall image.


Clutter (Background): The photo contains clutter behind the train/subject which detracts from the overall image. Examples include large poles, antennae, etc. "growing" from the top of the train, or
background structures which do not contrast well with the subject in the foreground.

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Overexposed

becomes

Overexposed: The image is overexposed (too bright). This occurs when too much light is exposed to the camera sensor/film when the image was captured.

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Underexposed

becomes

Underexposed: The image is underexposed (too dark). This occurs when not enough light is exposed to the camera sensor/film when the image was captured.

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Oversharpened

becomes

Oversharpened: The image suffers from excessive sharpening, meaning that straight lines (such as handrails, edges, and cheatlines) often appear very jagged.

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Scan (Dirty): Visible dirt or dust on scan

becomes

Scan (Dirty): This scanned image contains visible dirt, dust, hair, etc. This can be fixed either by cleaning the slide/print and re-scanning, or using the clone tool in a photo editing program to remove the dirt.

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Distracting Shadows

becomes

Distracting Shadows: Shadows are being cast onto the train/subject by trees, structures, caternary poles, etc. This rejection can also apply when, during early morning/late evening shots, the surrounding landscape is illuminated by the sun but the subject of the image is in shadows (such as a shaded cut, valley or gorge).

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Size (Small): Photo does not meet the minimum pixel size requirements outlined on the Photo Submission page.

unchanged

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Size (Dimensions): The photo is either too narrow vertically or horizontally. For normal landscape images, our recommended height for a 1024 pixel wide image is 680 to 768 pixels.

becomes

Size (Dimensions): In most cases, our prefered image aspect ratio is anywhere between 4:3 and 16:9 (1024x683-768, or 1200x800-900 pixels). Exceptions are made for images shot on older square-format film, or where the unusual aspect ratio has been applied for artistic/creative reasons.

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Undersharpened (Soft)

becomes

Undersharpened (Soft): The image is soft, meaning that straight lines such as handrails, train edges, etc. appear fuzzy. Most digital photos 'come out of the camera' soft, which is different than being blurry, and can normally be corrected with additional sharpening (and selective sharpening, where required) in a photo editing program.

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Double Upload

becomes

Double Upload: You have already submitted this photo to the database.

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Bad Filename: Using characters other than A-Z and 0-9 in your filename can cause problems with our system.

replaced with

File Error: Something seems to have gone wrong during the submission of your image. Please try sending your image again.

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Similar to Previous Photo

becomes

Similar to Previous Photo: This image is very similar to another photo (or photos) already published on RailPictures.Net. Please note that we try to offer our viewers a good overall variety of photography, so this can be applied to similar photos other photographers have already submitted, especially from high profile events or when a large group of railfans was shooting the same train from the same or similar angles.

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Uncorrected Reupload: This image appears to be an uncorrected resubmission of a previously rejected photo. You are welcome to reupload images as long as you have made improvements to them, but reuploading an uncorrected image is a violation of our user agreement. Please do not let this be a problem in the future.

becomes

Uncorrected Reupload: This image appears to be an uncorrected resubmission of a previously rejected photo. When resubmitting a rejected photo with corrections, please leave a note in the 'Comments to Screeners' field so that we can more easily see what changes you have made to the image.

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Banned: Your upload privileges have been revoked by the Editors of RailPictures.Net. Please e-mail the editors if you believe you have been banned in error.

unchanged

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Poor Image Quality

becomes

Poor Image Quality: The overall image quality of this image is below the standard which we wish to maintain for RailPictures.Net. This photo should not be resubmitted for consideration.

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Poor Esthetic Quality: This rejection reason means that the photo is of low esthetic qualities, or is simply not the type of material we are wishing to publish.

becomes

Poor Aesthetic Quality: This rejection means that the photo is of low aesthetic qualities, does not contain enough rail-related content, or is simply not the type of material we wish to publish.

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Trespassing: RailPictures.Net discourages trespassing on railroad property, and we make it a practice to reject photos where trespassing is obvious or where the photographer was in an obviously dangerous situation. If you are a railroad employee, otherwise had permission to be on railroad property when this photo was taken, or feel that we have made a mistake, please resubmit the image and include a note to the screeners explaining the specific circumstances.

new

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Bad Info: The locomotive/railroad/location or other data you entered for the photo is incorrect.

unchanged

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Composition/Balance: The composition of this photo is poor relating to the overall balance of the image.

changed to

Composition (Too Tight): The image is too tightly composed, meaning that there is not enough space between the subject and the edges of the photo.

Composition (Too Loose): The image is too loosely composed, meaning that there is excessive dead/empty space between the subject and the edges of the photo.

Composition (Balance): The subject is awkwardly positioned in the frame. RailPictures.Net prefers that images are composed in keeping with the 'Rule of Thirds' meaning that, in most circumstances, the focal point of the image should not be directly in the center of the frame, or too close to any of the edges.

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Subject Too Far Away: The train is too far in the distance.

unchanged

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Sensor Dust: This image has visible sensor dust spots. These can usually be removed via the clone tool in post-processing.

changed to

Sensor Dust: This image has visible sensor dust spots, which generally show up as fuzzy dark spots/blobs in the sky. These can usually be removed via the clone tool in a photo editor.

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Overprocessed: The photo appears to suffer from either excessive use of a grain removal tool, leading to a washed out oil-painted look, or overuse of the shadow/highlight tool in Photoshop, which can give the image a 'fake' appearance and create halos around darker objects.

changed to

Overprocessed (Noise Removal): This photo appears to suffer from excessive use of a noise/grain removal tool or filter, which can lead to a washed out, oil-painted look.

Overprocessed (S/H): The photo suffers from overuse of the shadow/highlight (or similar) tool in your photo editing software, which can give the image an unnatural appearance as well as lead to noticeable halos between darker and lighter areas of the image, such as the borders between an object and a blue sky.

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Lens Flare: The photo suffers from lens flare, a common problem in low light situations where the locomotive headlights cause undesired glare and artifacts to show up on the image.

changed to

Lens Flare: The photo suffers from lens flare, a common problem in low light situations where the locomotive headlights (or other light sources, such as street lamps) cause undesired glare and artifacts to show up on the image.

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Open Nose Door: Open nose doors on trains led by wide/safety cab locomotives are considered distracting and are generally not accepted unless the open door is an important part of the overall scene such as a crew change, etc.

new
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