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-   -   Leaning Right (http://www.railpictures.net/forums/showthread.php?t=18242)

abr 05-18-2019 03:27 PM

Leaning Right
 
The following overhead shot from Meriden, CT was rejected as leaning right: https://www.railpictures.net/viewrej...95&key=3078933

I'm looking at this with my grid lines in Lightroom and I'm not seeing it. In particular, when I look at the building edges on either side of the tracks, they appear vertical. Is there a different reference point I should be using?

Mberry 05-18-2019 05:30 PM

It does appear to be leaning right to me, especially when you look at the large building at center right. Try to level with the left edge of that building, i.e. the centre of your shot.

miningcamper1 05-20-2019 01:03 AM

Yeah, it's leaning right by a good one-half of one percent. Would I have noticed without zooming in 500%? No way! :shock:

bigbassloyd 05-20-2019 11:54 AM

What lens was used and what focal length was this shot taken at?

The proper fix depends on that answer.

Loyd L.

John West 05-21-2019 12:50 AM

Definitely leaning to the right. Check the roof lines of the buildings on the right side.

JBWX

abr 05-27-2019 03:49 PM

It took me awhile to get back to editing, but I managed to get it through on the second attempt. Thanks for the advice!

[photoid=698321]

Dennis A. Livesey 06-01-2019 11:19 PM

As I gleaned on these pages 10 years ago, the trick to leveling wide angle shots is finding a vertical or horizontal line in the middle of the image and leveling off that. The lines on the side then look natural even if they lean.

KevinM 06-02-2019 05:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dennis A. Livesey (Post 195500)
The lines on the side then look natural even if they lean.

Then a click or two on the Vertical Perspective slider takes care of even that. :-)

Dennis A. Livesey 06-02-2019 06:35 PM

Indeed yes Kevin.

bigbassloyd 06-03-2019 02:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KevinM (Post 195502)
Then a click or two on the Vertical Perspective slider takes care of even that. :-)

100000000000000% percent

Not fixing the lens generated distortion is lazy.. change my mind

Loyd L.

KevinM 06-03-2019 03:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bigbassloyd (Post 195504)
100000000000000% percent

Not fixing the lens generated distortion is lazy.. change my mind

Loyd L.

Generally speaking, I agree. I know some very good photographers who habitually end up with leaning verticals at the edges. Unless they happen to LIKE that, I agree that they should take take the extra minute or two to address that issue. The one situation in which I would cut them some slack is on a really wide shot, where the frame barely covered all of the essential elements, and doing full perspective correction would result in the loss of elements, or cut-off elements. If the scene is compelling enough and the only way they could render it is by accepting the lens distortion, then I am good with it. I think I've had that happen a couple of times to me. I always try to have a super-wide lens (like 14-24mm) with me, just in case I see something cool in a very confined space which requires the width. I've had some images that I shot with the 14-24 that just weren't correctable without losing the impact of the image.


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