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-   -   Camera Question (http://www.railpictures.net/forums/showthread.php?t=14627)

trainboysd40 11-26-2011 04:06 AM

I like AV and autofocus...I must not deserve anything more than a rebel.

Mr. Pick 11-26-2011 04:33 AM

I remember my dad griping about cameras with built in light meters.... ;-)

classiclights 11-26-2011 04:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Indecline (Post 145923)
Got it. I appreciate your response. :smile:

http://classiclights.org/Thumbs-Up-200x172.jpg

Bob Lyndall - Classiclights - Roanoke, VA

Chris Z 11-26-2011 05:32 AM

I guess Luddites will always exist.

Chris Z

JimThias 11-26-2011 12:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr. Pick (Post 145935)
I remember my dad griping about cameras with built in light meters.... ;-)

I bet stagecoach builders bitched about cars when they were invented, too. ;-)

Joe the Photog 11-26-2011 02:51 PM

I am one who uses manual controls 95% of the time, but auto focus about as much. My eye sight isn't improving with age and in that regard, the camera does better than I do. Obviously, I set the AF area for where I want the camera to focus and it gets it right most of the time and certainly more than I would.

As for manual controls, I think it's folly to buy an expensive SLR with nice lenses and then let the camera decide everything. Or anything for that matter. That's just my own personal feeling, but there is more than one way to skin a cat, as the saying goes. (Although I never understood that saying, especially.) But just as our processing can differ greatly to get good results, so can the way we shoot.

Although my way is right.

wds 11-26-2011 03:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Joe the Photog (Post 145951)
I am one who uses manual controls 95% of the time, but auto focus about as much. My eye sight isn't improving with age and in that regard, the camera does better than I do. Obviously, I set the AF area for where I want the camera to focus and it gets it right most of the time and certainly more than I would.

Anybody know if Canon has an optional split-reticle type focusing screen for the EOS digital SLRs? I could still focus manually if I had one of those.

JRMDC 11-26-2011 03:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Joe the Photog (Post 145951)
but there is more than one way to skin a cat, as the saying goes. (Although I never understood that saying, especially.)

Nobody knows, really.

http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_b...sages/135.html

Hatchetman 11-26-2011 04:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wds (Post 145956)
Anybody know if Canon has an optional split-reticle type focusing screen for the EOS digital SLRs? I could still focus manually if I had one of those.

Almost positive the answer to that is NO. Unfortunately.

Ron Flanary 11-26-2011 04:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JimThias (Post 145946)
I bet stagecoach builders bitched about cars when they were invented, too. ;-)

...Here's a variation of a great line from the late Southern comic "Brother Dave" Gardner to illustrate the point:

"There were these two cavemen sittin' in a cave just beatin' on rocks, tryin' to make some rhythym. Finally, one of 'em looks up and says, '....hey man...you reckon' we'll ever have radio?..."

When I first heard it in 1960, I thought it was hilarious. Time marches on...

JRMDC 11-26-2011 04:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wds (Post 145956)
Anybody know if Canon has an optional split-reticle type focusing screen for the EOS digital SLRs? I could still focus manually if I had one of those.

Here is what they have, by camera body:

http://www.learn.usa.canon.com/app/p...QuickGuide.pdf

wds 11-26-2011 05:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JRMDC (Post 145970)
Here is what they have, by camera body:

http://www.learn.usa.canon.com/app/p...QuickGuide.pdf

Thanks J. Looks like I'm SOL unless I want to upgrade to a 1D series (which I don't because I've tried them and find them too heavy and awkward for my taste). Oh well.

John West 11-26-2011 08:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Joe the Photog (Post 145951)
As for manual controls, I think it's folly to buy an expensive SLR with nice lenses and then let the camera decide everything.

Using the various programmed/auto modes is not necessarily letting the camera decide everything. They are just a tool. That is why they have those little readouts in the view finder so that you can see what the camera is doing and change it if you don't agree.

I use programmed modes most of the time because the camera can respond to rapidly changing lighting faster than I can manually. But I also monitor what the camera is doing and modify the settings frequently based on any number of considerations.

I decided I needed a camera with auto features some 25 years ago while standing by the tracks in Montana with the sun coming and going behind clouds. Constantly changing the settings on my old Nikon F was a pain.

My big complaint with auto stuff is the loss of complete depth of field scales on AF lenses. In the old days I used zone focusing with considerable success.

Lots of ways to skin the cat.

JRMDC 11-26-2011 08:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wds (Post 145956)
Anybody know if Canon has an optional split-reticle type focusing screen for the EOS digital SLRs? I could still focus manually if I had one of those.

Is this what you mean by "split-reticle"?

http://www.amazon.com/Fotodiox-Repla...2340739&sr=8-2

Here is a Canon screen with a grid but no center stuff. It says 40D but the comments show people have used it on 60D

http://www.amazon.com/Canon-Focusing...2340739&sr=8-1

wds 11-26-2011 09:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JRMDC (Post 145981)
Is this what you mean by "split-reticle"?

http://www.amazon.com/Fotodiox-Repla...2340739&sr=8-2

That's it! So I can get one for my 40D, but it doesn't say anything about one for the 5D. That doesn't mean they're not out there, I'll keep looking.

jnohallman 11-26-2011 10:15 PM

Back to the original question, what do you have the ISO set to? Unless the 7D is remarkably different from my 40D, the only way the camera will switch the ISO on you is if you have the ISO setting itself on auto. With the 40D, if your have the ISO set at 100 and set the camera to something in shutter priority mode, the camera will adjust the aperture. What will happen is that if it can't set an aperture that correlates with the ISO and the shutter speed in relation to the lighting, you'll get the lovely blinking aperture warning. Anyone with a 7D know if it really behaves differently?

Jon

Ron Flanary 11-26-2011 10:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John West (Post 145980)
Using the various programmed/auto modes is not necessarily letting the camera decide everything. They are just a tool. That is why they have those little readouts in the view finder so that you can see what the camera is doing and change it if you don't agree.

I'm with you, John. I normally shoot with manual settings, but today's digital cameras are worlds apart from the "auto" models from the '60s. Back then, if you had any serious intentions of getting a good shot, you figured out the manual settings, studied the light and the circumstances of the shot (depth of field; speed of train; back lighting, etc.), and always had a good working knowledge of the film you were using. Today, however, digital cameras can actually get it "right" more times than not. There's no macho-driven reason to shoot manual unless you think you're smarter than the camera (or, you're looking for a particular effect that the camera might not otherwise choose).

khalucha 11-27-2011 12:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jnohallman (Post 145987)
Back to the original question, what do you have the ISO set to? Unless the 7D is remarkably different from my 40D, the only way the camera will switch the ISO on you is if you have the ISO setting itself on auto. With the 40D, if your have the ISO set at 100 and set the camera to something in shutter priority mode, the camera will adjust the aperture. What will happen is that if it can't set an aperture that correlates with the ISO and the shutter speed in relation to the lighting, you'll get the lovely blinking aperture warning. Anyone with a 7D know if it really behaves differently?

Jon

My dad has one and when I played with it for a little bit it seems to act the same way as my 40D with your question. The little light blinks in the corner saying no go.

@ Jim, as for your request to make a higher end camera with just manual settings. I will never see them doing that because a lot of people think that if they buy a better camera they will take better pictures. That is why I see them putting the "Auto" mode on a lot of the camera's.

JimThias 11-27-2011 03:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by khalucha (Post 146007)
@ Jim, as for your request to make a higher end camera with just manual settings. I will never see them doing that because a lot of people think that if they buy a better camera they will take better pictures. That is why I see them putting the "Auto" mode on a lot of the camera's.

Did people think that in the past with high end SLRs that were pretty much all manual with no bells and whistles? (I'm asking because I was never quite a part of the SLR/film generation). I do understand what you're saying, though. Man, I wish I hadn't given up on photography when I took a class back in 1984. :-(

Greg P 11-27-2011 04:01 AM

My first camera was a Cannon AE-1. Manual focus. Never again unless I am doing something specific I want to focus.

I may have be guilty slightly of the better camera better pictures; mostly because I wanted the 19 auto focus points.

But I took it out Friday in Mannasas VA and I did TV with ISO set to 100 and it did good with the F selection, so maybe I need to do 2 of the 3.

JimThias 11-27-2011 04:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Greg P (Post 146041)
I may have be guilty slightly of the better camera better pictures; mostly because I wanted the 19 auto focus points.

In the 6 years I've been using DSLRs, I've only ever used one focus point. What would you need 19 for?

troy12n 11-27-2011 04:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JimThias (Post 146043)
In the 6 years I've been using DSLRs, I've only ever used one focus point. What would you need 19 for?

I would love to be able to use more than 1, but most non-1 series AF points suck except for center point, especially in servo mode.

Indecline 11-27-2011 04:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JimThias (Post 146043)
In the 6 years I've been using DSLRs, I've only ever used one focus point. What would you need 19 for?

At the risk of pissing every one off again, it is nice to have a screen full of auto focus points to ensure that the composition you want has what you want in focus. If your focus point is dead center, more often than not your subject will end up centered. It seemed like most of my Nikon N90 shots ended up being centered. Fast moving trains are hard to do a focus hold and recompose.

DS

troy12n 11-27-2011 04:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Indecline (Post 146051)
At the risk of pissing every one off again, it is nice to have a screen full of auto focus points to ensure that the composition you want has what you want in focus.

Exactly...

Quote:

If your focus point is dead center, more often than not your subject will end up centered.
Or you have to crop around it, which works most of the time.

Mr. Pick 11-27-2011 04:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by troy12n (Post 146047)
I would love to be able to use more than 1, but most non-1 series AF points suck except for center point, especially in servo mode.

I hear that a lot, but I don't agree with it. I routinely select between all the available focus points on my 60D, depending on the framing of the shot vs where the moving object, like a train, will be, and all nine points perform very well. And that's using AI servo. In fact, I haven't had an out of focus shot on a moving train yet, and I've used all the focus points at one time or the other.

I've also used different focus points on nitro dragsters down at the finish line where they are coming at me at 200 to 300 mph and the various focus points all worked very well. The center may be the best, but the others aren't shabby.

Just my experience.


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