RailPictures.Net Forums

RailPictures.Net Forums (http://www.railpictures.net/forums/index.php)
-   Railroad Photography Forum (http://www.railpictures.net/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=9)
-   -   Camera Question (http://www.railpictures.net/forums/showthread.php?t=14627)

Ron Flanary 11-27-2011 10:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by milwman (Post 146122)
Oh I don't know but your right it's not like it was, A lot more fans have good cameras now so one isn't compelled to save history like it was in the 40-70's.
JEPG's can be saved after uploading to a tiff and discard the junk and all will be fine.

Exactly....and that's what I do. Those fine JPEGs have worked for me, though. I've had a cover on Trains, one on Railroads Illustrated, and at least four or five articles, all shot as JPEGs with a digital camera. I save what I think is worth it----copy the shots over and do any manipulation (levels or something like that), and save them as TIFs. That gets uploaded to the magazine---and then it's published. I've also had at least a dozen or more digital images in the various McMillan Publications wall calendars since I converted from film (at the end of 2004)---and I use the same process.

If I shot the same stuff in RAW----no one in the entire world would know the difference.

I honestly don't think much of what is being photographed today will exist in any retrievable format 40 or 50 years from now---for lots of technical and practical reasons. It's not like you'll be finding rare glass negatives from the 1880s in the future.

milwman 11-27-2011 11:03 PM

JPEGs if you don't have to shoot RAW But for bad light or Night work one all most has to.
I shoot RAW most of the time but will switch to JPEG if I am going to a high frame rate and don't want to load my Buffer with big RAWs.

khalucha 11-28-2011 01:02 AM

I was a jpeg fan, but once I started to learn how to do minor raw post processing, I switched over to full raw. Yes, it take more room, but on the other had digital media is pretty cheap. I can get 300 pictures on 1 4 gig compact flash card. I have been able to save a lot more pictures that I like this way.

As for storage, I go through my pictures and keep the ones I like and delete the ones I do not. Once in a while I will burn (jpeg) the stuff I want to keep to a disk and put it to the side.

John West 11-28-2011 01:20 AM

RAW versus JPG
 
I shoot RAW. In a very few instances where I have underexposed, RAW has allowed me to save the image. But in the vast majority of situations I doubt that JPG versus RAW makes any difference in the final product.

I recently sold some images to a calendar publisher. The easiest way to transmit them to the publisher was for me to take my large post processing files (that end up as TIF files in my archives), convert them to smaller JPG fine files, and then I could simply attach them to an email. This was quick and dirty, but provided more than enough quality for calendar size images. The publisher simply said he would convert them back to TIF and take it from there. Some loss of data? Sure. But not enough to trouble a demanding publisher.

It's like a lot of the things that have been discussed in this thread. There are multiple ways to get from here to there, and achieve equivalent levels of quality.

On the other hand, I do enjoy the exchange of ideas, and they do cause me to try new things and sometimes even change my ways....even at my advanced age!

JBWX

Cameron A. Photography 12-02-2011 09:55 PM

Just got the 5D Mk II, been using Manual settings on my T2i for a few months prior so clicking Manual on a 5D2 is pretty much the same, except now I'm working with 21mp and a CMOS/all-EF system.

You're using a 7D? Good choice, probably the best APS-C/EF-S setup you can get.

Here's a tip my good sir...use Manual settings. :) Manual settings, manual focus... all that jazz. It releases you from the constraints of having your DLSR find settings for you, and sometimes messing up your shots.

Manual man. Have faith in the M!

cam

Dennis A. Livesey 12-03-2011 01:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cameron A. Photography (Post 146921)
now I'm working with 21mp and a CMOS/all-EF system.

You're using a 7D? Good choice, probably the best APS-C/EF-S setup you can get.
cam

The 5D and the 7D are both CMOS.

The APS-C sized (22.3 x 14.9 mm) sensor 7D can take take all Canon EF mount lenses including EF-S. (Short focus)

The Full Frame sized (36 x 24 mm) sensor 5D can take all Canon EF lenses except EF-S.

JRMDC 12-03-2011 01:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cameron A. Photography (Post 146921)
Here's a tip my good sir...use Manual settings. :) Manual settings, manual focus... all that jazz. It releases you from the constraints of having your DLSR find settings for you, and sometimes messing up your shots.

Manual man. Have faith in the M!

Here's a tip my good sir...use semi-auto/auto settings. :) Semi-auto settings, auto focus... all that jazz. It releases you from the constraints of having to find settings for your DLSR, and sometimes messing up your shots or getting distracted by the exposure/focus process over the composition.

Semi-auto man. Have faith in the AF and the Av!

JimThias 12-03-2011 02:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JRMDC (Post 146938)
Here's a tip my good sir...use semi-auto/auto settings. :) Semi-auto settings, auto focus... all that jazz. It releases you from the constraints of having to find settings for your DLSR, and sometimes messing up your shots or getting distracted by the exposure/focus process over the composition.

Semi-auto man. Have faith in the AF and the Av!

I never realized it was so tough to roll the dial to pick a shutter speed. Man, some people must work up a sweat over that! :lol:

trainboysd40 12-03-2011 05:14 PM

AND you can use the real wheel. Isn't that GREAT?

jnohallman 12-03-2011 06:38 PM

Isn't how one chooses to use a camera kind of like what kind of pictures a person chooses to shoot? Shouldn't it all come down to what they like and what works for them? As far as I can tell, the only "wrong" way to use a camera is to leave the lens cap on when you take a picture.

Jon

Greg P 12-04-2011 02:38 AM

I've been using it in TV mode; and forcing the ISO. I've only been out once but I got this

[photoid=381982]

Holloran Grade 12-04-2011 07:08 AM

Real Photographers Don't Turn Their Own Wheels.
 
I have an assistant that travels with me where ever I go and it is their job to turn the "wheel.";-)

I just yell out f-stops and exposures - they do the heavy lifting.

milwman 12-04-2011 11:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Greg P (Post 147025)
I've been using it in TV mode; and forcing the ISO. I've only been out once but I got this

If it works for you fine but setting up a shots isn't hard and part of the fun the way I see it. Paramount to framing and getting in place for a photo.

JimThias 12-04-2011 12:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jnohallman (Post 146986)
Isn't how one chooses to use a camera kind of like what kind of pictures a person chooses to shoot? Shouldn't it all come down to what they like and what works for them? As far as I can tell, the only "wrong" way to use a camera is to leave the lens cap on when you take a picture.

Jon

Very true. But I just laugh when I read how complicated it must be to use M, so let's let the camera do it. I don't know, maybe I'm a little jaded about the fact that it took me 20 years before the light went off in my head about how easy it is to use manual. 20 years of potential photography wasted because I didn't "get it." But then I was like, seriously? That's how easy it is? http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y17...milies/azz.gif

Holloran Grade 12-04-2011 05:42 PM

Prior to the late 70's there was no Program Mode.
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by JimThias (Post 147050)
..... 20 years of potential photography wasted because I didn't "get it." But then I was like, seriously? That's how easy it is?

I think the first camera I used with auto settings was a Canon AE-1 (I still have it).

I remember that at the time, I thought that body really kicked butt and I enjoyed using it because you didn't need to fiddle with the light meter and the f-stop every time you want to take a picture.

It think nowadays everyone expects to use the easy button on everything, so people don't even think to shoot manual.

I blame Steve Jobs for that.

Apple was innovative at making technology easier to use and the world is a better place because of that.

Manual requires that the user be familiar with the equipment and skilled in it's use, rather than just pointing and shooting.

Additionally, each model of camera body is different, so it requires you to get a feel for the settings and there is a bit of a learning curve.

JimThias 12-04-2011 10:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Holloran Grade (Post 147079)

Manual requires that the user be familiar with the equipment and skilled in it's use, rather than just pointing and shooting.

Additionally, each model of camera body is different, so it requires you to get a feel for the settings and there is a bit of a learning curve.

Yes, there is a little learning curve for each individual body, but once you get to "know" it, you can pretty much shoot in manual like it's a point and shoot.

troy12n 12-04-2011 11:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Greg P (Post 147025)
I've been using it in TV mode; and forcing the ISO. I've only been out once but I got this

[photoid=381982]

That's all good and well, but you do realize by doing this, it's going to auto-select your aperture. You end up with too shallow a depth of field and it ruins your shot...

JimThias 12-04-2011 11:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by troy12n (Post 147130)
That's all good and well, but you do realize by doing this, it's going to auto-select your aperture. You end up with too shallow a depth of field and it ruins your shot...

The DOF in that particular shot looks fine to me. http://bestsmileys.com/clueless/4.gif

BenEPhoto 12-04-2011 11:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by khalucha (Post 146079)
Jim, on the same note, why do they put JPEG in some of the higher end cameras as well? You would think it would be all RAW. Not to change subject here but a thought to ponder.

Because RAW takes longer to process and when you're on a deadline with media agencies or companies that need the photos fast and right now you have to shoot JPEG. So they leave it in for that reason.

Holloran Grade 12-05-2011 02:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JimThias (Post 147127)
Yes, there is a little learning curve for each individual body, but once you get to "know" it, you can pretty much shoot in manual like it's a point and shoot.

This is true.

Sort of like the old days.

Holloran Grade 12-05-2011 02:43 AM

A Shout Out to Nick!
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mark woody (Post 146063)
...Nick Benson.....

He who shall not be named.:lol:

Nick is busy reproducing, so he doesn't have time to hang out here.

Funny how that happens.:wink:

troy12n 12-05-2011 02:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JimThias (Post 147132)
The DOF in that particular shot looks fine to me. http://bestsmileys.com/clueless/4.gif

I wasnt making reference to that specific show, just quoted him.

JimThias 12-05-2011 02:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BenEPhoto (Post 147134)
Because RAW takes longer to process and when you're on a deadline with media agencies or companies that need the photos fast and right now you have to shoot JPEG. So they leave it in for that reason.

Totally understandable, but I'd still love a raw-only camera body to lower the cost of not having a jpg processing system in the camera. :)

Quote:

Originally Posted by troy12n (Post 147237)
I wasnt making reference to that specific show, just quoted him.

Ah...I thought you may have been using that photo as an example.

troy12n 12-05-2011 03:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JimThias (Post 147238)
Totally understandable, but I'd still love a raw-only camera body to lower the cost of not having a jpg processing system in the camera. :)


I dont think that would lower the cost one bit. Just like some people say they dont use video and would want a DSLR without video. Well, the money was spent on the R&D, at this point, adding some of these functions to DSLR's is a trivial thing, and it would not save you any money at all.

Chris Z 12-05-2011 03:02 AM

My Nikon D700 also shoots TIFF files. They are larger than RAW but I don't know what the advantage is.

Chris Z


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:55 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.