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-   -   Give one piece of advice to a beginner photog: (http://www.railpictures.net/forums/showthread.php?t=15480)

Hatchetman 06-12-2012 05:21 PM

Give one piece of advice to a beginner photog:
 
not that I'm any good, but I want to hear what others say:

I would say always carry a camera with you and look for opportunities.

JRMDC 06-12-2012 05:46 PM

Wow, photography is so complex, hard to think of one piece. I will do three:

1) doing: what Hatch said
2) seeing: look at your pictures and think, really think, about why they "work" or don't
3) learning: look at lots of other pictures and think, really think, about why they "work" or don't

bigbassloyd 06-12-2012 06:40 PM

Once you learn how to take a technically correct (focus, exposure, etc) photograph, stop listening to everyone and do your own thing.

Loyd L.

Holloran Grade 06-12-2012 06:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hatchetman (Post 156585)
not that I'm any good, but I want to hear what others say:

I would say always carry a camera with you and look for opportunities.

You can do that, and you can go back an shoot things that you saw and composed in your head.:p

nikos1 06-12-2012 07:05 PM

Find a better hobby, this one sucks. (only half kidding)

JimThias 06-12-2012 09:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bigbassloyd (Post 156593)
Once you learn how to take a technically correct (focus, exposure, etc) photograph, stop listening to everyone and do your own thing.

Loyd L.

http://www.fitsnews.com/wp-content/u...il-on-head.jpg

Freericks 06-12-2012 09:49 PM

However, before you are technically correct, go out and copy what you have seen others do and find that you like. Begin by imitating and then move on to your own style and vision. The imitation will teach you much about how others did it (through your failures and your successes).

Hatchetman 06-12-2012 10:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nikos1 (Post 156598)
Find a better hobby, this one sucks. (only half kidding)

Why would you do a hobby you don't enjoy?:lol::confused:

KevinM 06-12-2012 10:10 PM

  1. Learn how to take technically correct photos with your camera in manual exposure mode. This part is easy. You can take classes or learn it on your own. Neither takes very long.
  2. Get proficient with your processing software. This is a HUGE part of making stunning photos. Again, you can take classes or learn it on your own. The latter will be a struggle if you are a perfectionist.
  3. Learn to "see" shots before you take them and even before the scene develops. The only way to learn this is OJT. Get out and practice with people who are better at it than you are.

Joe the Photog 06-12-2012 10:24 PM

My piece of advice would be, "Don't let anyone tell you how hard photography is. Just go out and do it." Then I would point them to this thread from bits of advice starting at #2.

Hatchetman 06-12-2012 11:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Joe the Photog (Post 156611)
My piece of advice would be, "Don't let anyone tell you how hard photography is. Just go out and do it." Then I would point them to this thread from bits of advice starting at #2.

Are you saying you don't like my advice?:lol:

nikos1 06-13-2012 12:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hatchetman (Post 156609)
Why would you do a hobby you don't enjoy?:lol::confused:

I ask myself that same question alot. Theres still enough interesting things out there but you have to travel further and further, and the future looks pretty boring with standardized locomotive fleets and infrastructure (signals), all the shortlines taken over by the orange borg, not to mention always having to worry about whether your going to get bothered by the police.
I wouldn't discourage anyone but can't say I'd recommend the hobby to anyone either.

Mgoldman 06-13-2012 01:33 AM

First, and foremost... Remove the lens cap.

Afterwards, a few tips:
Get off Automatic - learn what each setting is and how they affect the final image.
After you find your subject, find your light and shoot to best capture it. Start with the sun over your shoulder and work your way towards trickier lighting.
Get a good editing program and learn the basics.
(levels, dodge - burn, shadows /highlight (fill light), cropping, ect.

Buy a lamp shade if you are so poor you can't afford a true lens hood.

/Mitch

Dennis A. Livesey 06-13-2012 01:53 AM

Learn your camera and all it's features. Don't ignore the manual out of laziness or pride.

Shoot through it, not behind it, be one with it.

Then forget it because is it's the least important part of photography.

JimThias 06-13-2012 12:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mgoldman (Post 156618)
Buy a lamp shade if you are so poor you can't afford a true lens hood.

Or if you find yourself needing an extended lens hood to shoot in a blizzard and don't have time to hunt one down, use a small lamp shade from the dollar store down the street. :p

lock4244 06-13-2012 02:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JimThias (Post 156628)
Or if you find yourself needing an extended lens hood to shoot in a blizzard and don't have time to hunt one down, use a small lamp shade from the dollar store down the street. :p

Necessity, the mother of invention.

lock4244 06-13-2012 02:45 PM

Don't take it to seriously... it's just a hobby.

Met a few folks that take criticism as if someone verbally attacked their child.

Mark Rosnick 06-14-2012 07:14 PM

Make sure you could operate your camera blindfolded. Not quite as easy as it used to be with digital, but make certain you know how to use the camera and all of it's features. Do your own thing.

jnohallman 06-14-2012 07:18 PM

Don't turn the camera sideways in the camera bag, or all the pixels will fall out! :lol:

Jon

oltmannd 06-14-2012 07:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Freericks (Post 156608)
However, before you are technically correct, go out and copy what you have seen others do and find that you like. Begin by imitating and then move on to your own style and vision. The imitation will teach you much about how others did it (through your failures and your successes).

This is really good advise! Just do it and learn as you go, and remember the only one you have to please with your photographs is yourself.

If you are not having any fun, you are doing it wrong.

WMHeilman 06-15-2012 02:52 AM

Be creative.

Heymon 06-15-2012 05:17 AM

Accept criticism. As an example, the rejections that I get from this website have really helped me learn to take better photos everywhere, not just trackside. I think many have a tendency to get defensive because they are emotionally invested in a photo (like what they had to go through to get it, or it being a special subject to them, etc.) and scoff at any notion their shot is deficient in some way (been there). I have really learned from other people's eyes.

Andre

Mgoldman 06-15-2012 06:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mark Rosnick (Post 156678)
Make sure you could operate your camera blindfolded. Not quite as easy as it used to be with digital, but make certain you know how to use the camera and all of it's features. Do your own thing.

I must respectfully disagree with Mark here. As a beginner I suggest not using a blindfold initially.

/Mitch

Holloran Grade 06-15-2012 06:39 AM

What you don't want to do.
 
Take a good hard look at all the images in this photostream, and then don't do anything like it.:razz:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/sd40e_images/

That will save you a year or two of frustration and heartache right off the bat.:lol:

BUFFIE 06-15-2012 06:59 AM

Spend the money to get a quality education
 
If only I had listened to my Mom..............:D

http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c2...INGDIPLOMA.jpg


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